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E. E. Adderley

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E. J. Smith, E. E. Adderley, and F. D. Bethwaite

Abstract

From 1958 to 1963 an experiment was conducted in the New England region of Australia, in which clouds were seeded with silver iodide smoke released from an aircraft. Clouds over two areas were seeded, with random choice of area. Rainfall measurements in the two areas suggest that seeding increased the rainfall during the first year, but no net changes in rainfall could be detected in subsequent years. The seeding appears to have increased the variability of rainfall.

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E. J. Smith, E. E. Adderley, and F. D. Bethwaite

Abstract

A cloud-seeding experiment was conducted in South Australia from 1957 to 1959 inclusive in which clouds over one of two areas were seeded with silver-iodide smoke released from an aircraft, with random choice of area. No precipitation increases due to seeding were detected.

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E. J. Smith, E. E. Adderley, and D. T. Walsh

Abstract

A cloud-seeding experiment was conducted in the Snowy Mountains of Australia from 1955–1959 inclusive. The objective was to determine if silver-iodide smoke released from an aircraft into clouds could increase the precipitation over a selected area. The method involved a comparison of the precipitation in a target area and that in a control area during randomized periods of seeding and no seeding. Over the five years, the ratio of the precipitation in the target to that in the control area was higher in seeded than in unseeded periods. Three statistical tests are presented which show that the seeded periods are different from the unseeded periods at significance levels of 0.03, 0.09 and 0.03 (one sided). This supports a positive seeding effect. Other analyses both detract from and support this contention. The net result is that the experiment in inconclusive. Further, improved experiments are proposed.

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