Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 43 items for

  • Author or Editor: Yukari N. Takayabu x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Chie Yokoyama and Yukari N. Takayabu

Abstract

Synoptic-scale westward-propagating disturbances over the eastern Pacific (EP) are analyzed in boreal autumn, utilizing spectral analysis, composite analysis, and energy budget analysis. The results are compared with those over the western Pacific (WP).

Spectral peaks of total precipitable water (TPW) and vertical velocity at 850 hPa (ω850), and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) are detected at periods of ~3–7 days over the EP. Meanwhile over the WP, a spectral peak of OLR is pronounced, but peaks of TPW and ω850 are not detected. Composite analysis reveals that disturbances that have a coupled structure, with a vortex at its center near ~9°N and a mixed Rossby–gravity (MRG) wave–type disturbance, frequently exist over the EP. At the same time, the disturbances have a double-deck structure associated with divergence both in the upper and in the middle to lower troposphere. These disturbances are associated with both deep convection and congestus, which generate kinetic energy of the disturbance in the upper and in the lower troposphere, respectively.

Examining diabatic heating in relation to the coupled disturbances, deep heating with the peak at the height of ~7.5 km is greatest in the northeastern part of the vortex. The coupled MRG wave–type disturbance provides a relatively deep cross-equatorial southerly flow into the northeastern part of the vortex. It is suggested that deep rain is maintained with the existence of deep convergence produced by the coupled disturbances over the EP, where a very shallow convergence field exists on average.

Full access
Ayako Seiki and Yukari N. Takayabu

Abstract

The mechanism of synoptic-scale eddy development in the generation of westerly wind bursts (WWBs) over the western–central Pacific, and their relationship with the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO), were examined. In the WWB occurrences, barotropic structures of equatorial eddy westerlies with cyclonic disturbances were found from the surface to the upper troposphere. The dominant contributions to substantial eddy kinetic energy (EKE) were the barotropic energy conversion (KmKe) in the lower and middle tropospheres and the conversion from eddy available potential energy (PeKe) in the upper troposphere. Low-frequency environmental westerlies centered near the equator preceded strong zonal convergence and meridional shear, resulting in the substantial KmKe. The activation of synoptic convection also contributed to an increase in EKE through PeKe. These energies were redistributed to the lower-equatorial troposphere through energy flux convergence (GKe). These results showed that environmental fields contribute to the EKE increase near the equator and are important factors in WWB occurrences. Next, eddy growth was compared under different phases of MJO and ENSO. The MJO westerly phases of strong MJO events were classified into two groups, in terms of ENSO phases. Higher EKE values were found over the equatorial central Pacific in the WWB–ENSO correlated (pre–El Niño) periods. The energetics during these periods comported with those of the WWB generations. In the uncorrelated periods, the enhancement of eddy disturbances occurred far from the equator near the Philippines, where the activities of the easterly wave disturbances are well known. It is noteworthy that the enhanced region of the disturbances in the pre–El Niño periods coincided with the vicinity of large-scale MJO convection. It is suggested that coincidence corresponds with an enhancement of the internal disturbances embedded in the MJO, which is found only when the environmental conditions are favorable in association with ENSO.

Full access
Satoru Yokoi and Yukari N. Takayabu

Abstract

Variability in tropical cyclone (TC) activity is a matter of direct concern for affected populations. On interannual and longer time scales, variability in TC passage frequency can be associated with total TC frequency over the concerned ocean basin [basinwide frequency (BF)], the spatial distribution of TC genesis in the basin [genesis distribution (GD)], and the preferable track (PT) that can be considered as a function of genesis locations. To facilitate investigation of mechanisms responsible for the variability, the authors propose an approach of decomposing anomalies in the passage frequency into contributions of variability in BF, GD, and PT, which is named the Integration of Statistics on TC Activity by Genesis Location (ISTAGL) analysis. Application of this approach to TC best track data in the western North Pacific (WNP) basin reveals that overall distribution of the passage frequency trends over the 1961–2010 period is mainly due to the PT trends. On decadal time scales, passage frequency variability in midlatitudes is primarily due to PT variability, while the BF and GD also play roles in the subtropics. The authors further discuss decadal variability over the East China Sea in detail. The authors demonstrate that northward shift of the PT for TCs generated around the Philippines Sea and westward shift for TCs generated in the eastern part of the WNP contribute the variability with almost equal degree. The relationships between these PT shifts and anomalies in environmental circulation fields are also discussed.

Full access
Chie Yokoyama and Yukari N. Takayabu

Abstract

Three-dimensional rain characteristics of tropical cyclones (TCs) are statistically quantified, using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data from December 1997 to December 2003. Tropical cyclones are classified into four maximum intensity classes (<34, 34–64, 64–128, and ≥128 kt) and three stages (developing, mature, and decaying). First, rain characteristics of TCs are compared with those of the equatorial (10°N–10°S) mean. A notable finding here is that the average stratiform rain ratio (SRR), which is the contribution from stratiform rain in the total rainfall, of TCs is 52%, while it is 44% for the equatorial oceanic mean and 46% for the Madden–Julian oscillation in its mature phase. Stronger rain is observed in TCs both for convective and stratiform rain. Second, radial rain characteristics of TCs suggest that the region 0–60 km can be classified as “the inner core,” and 60–500 km as “the rainband.” The inner core is characterized with small SRR, very high rain-top height, and a large flash rate, indicating the vigor of convective activity. In contrast, the rainband is characterized with large SRR and relatively large rain yield per flash, indicating a large rainfall amount with a moderate convective activity. An important implication of this study is that TCs are listed in the high end of tropical oceanic organized rain systems, in terms of the organization levels of rain. Last, we use the above composite results to calculate the rainfall contribution of TCs to total annual rainfall between 35°N and 35°S as 3.3% ± 0.1%.

Full access
Atsushi Hamada and Yukari N. Takayabu

Abstract

This paper demonstrates the impact of the enhancement in detectability by the dual-frequency precipitation radar (DPR) on board the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core observatory. By setting two minimum detectable reflectivities—12 and 18 dBZ—artificially to 6 months of GPM DPR measurements, the precipitation occurrence and volume increase by ~21.1% and ~1.9%, respectively, between 40°S and 40°N.

GPM DPR is found to be able to detect light precipitation, which mainly consists of two distinct types. One type is shallow precipitation, which is most significant for convective precipitation over eastern parts of subtropical oceans, where deep convection is typically suppressed. The other type is probably associated with lower parts of anvil clouds associated with organized precipitation systems.

While these echoes have lower reflectivities than the official value of the minimum detectable reflectivity, they are found to mostly consist of true precipitation signals, suggesting that the official value may be too conservative for some sort of meteorological analyses. These results are expected to further the understanding of both global energy and water budgets and the diabatic heating distribution.

Full access
Atsushi Hamada and Yukari N. Takayabu

Abstract

This study reports on the presence of suspicious “extreme rainfall” data in the 2A25 version-7 (V7) product of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) dataset and introduces a simple method for detecting and filtering out the suspicious data. These suspicious data in V7 are found by comparing the extreme rainfall characteristics in the V7 and version-6 products. Most of the suspicious extremes are located over land, especially in mountainous regions. Radar reflectivities in the suspicious extremes show significant monotonic increases toward the echo bottom. These facts indicate that the suspicious extremes are mainly caused by contamination from ground or sea clutter. A simple thresholding filter for eliminating the suspicious extreme data is developed using common characteristics in the horizontal and vertical rainfall structures and reflectivities in the suspicious extremes. The proposed filter mitigates deformations in the frequency distribution of the surface rainfall rate in the 2A25 V7 product.

Full access
Chie Yokoyama and Yukari N. Takayabu

Abstract

Differences in the characteristics of rain systems in the eastern Pacific (EP) intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) and the western Pacific (WP) warm pool are quantitatively examined in relation to the large-scale environment. This study mainly uses precipitation feature (PF) data observed by the precipitation radar (PR) on board the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). The PFs are classified into four types according to their areas and maximum heights. Rain from tall unorganized systems and very tall organized systems tends to be dominant in high-SST regions such as the WP. On the other hand, the EP has more rain from congestus and organized systems with moderate heights than the WP. It is shown that shallow rain from congestus and moderately deep rain from organized systems are highly correlated with shallow (1000–925 hPa) convergence fields with coefficients of 0.75 and 0.66, respectively. These relationships between characteristics of rain systems and the large-scale environment are robust through all seasons.

Full access
Hiroki Tsuji and Yukari N. Takayabu

Abstract

A significant enhancement of precipitation can result from the interplay between two independent, large-scale phenomena: an atmospheric river (AR) and a cutoff low. An AR is a long, narrow region with a deep moist layer. A cutoff low is an upper-level cyclonic eddy isolated from the meandering upper-level westerly jet. Herein, we construct composites of cutoff lows both close to an AR (AR-close category) and distant from an AR (AR-distant category) over a 14-yr period across the western North Pacific region. A comparison between the two categories shows an enhanced precipitation area to the northwest of the cutoff low and to the south of the AR axis in the AR-close category. The horizontal formation among the AR, cutoff low, and enhanced precipitation area in the composite coincides with that in a disastrous flood event that occurred in Hiroshima, Japan, in 2014. The deep moist layer associated with the AR, and the destabilization and isentropic up-gliding effect associated with the cutoff low are also observed in both the composite and the Hiroshima cases. We further evaluate the distribution of quasigeostrophic forcing (Q vector) for vertical motion. This shows that warm air advection associated with the AR overcomes the descending forcing inherent in the northwest of the cutoff low and makes the instability and up-gliding effect in that region more effective. These results indicate that the interplay between ARs and cutoff lows is a common mechanism in the enhancement of precipitation and the Hiroshima case is an extreme precipitation event caused by this interplay.

Open access
Ayako Seiki and Yukari N. Takayabu

Abstract

Statistical features of the relationship among westerly wind bursts (WWBs), the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and intraseasonal variations (ISVs) were examined using 40-yr European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Re-Analysis data (ERA-40) for the period of January 1979–August 2002. WWBs were detected over the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean, but not over the Atlantic Ocean. WWB frequencies for each region were lag correlated with a sea surface temperature anomaly over the Niño-3 region. WWBs tended to occur in sequence, from the western to eastern Pacific, leading the El Niño peak by 9 months to 1 month, respectively, and after around 11 months, over the Indian Ocean. These results suggest that WWB occurrences are not random, but interactive with ENSO. Composite analysis revealed that most WWBs were associated with slowdowns of eastward-propagating convective regions like the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO), with the intensified Rossby wave response. However, seasonal and interannual variations in MJO amplitude were not correlated with WWB frequency, while a strong MJO event tended to bear WWBs. It is suggested that the strong MJO amplitude promotes favorable conditions, but it is not the only factor influencing WWB frequency. An environment common to WWB generation in all regions was the existence of background westerlies around the WWB center near the equator. It is inferred that ENSO prepares a favorable environment for the structural transformation of an MJO, that is, the intensified Rossby wave response, that results in WWB generations. The role of the background wind fields on WWB generations will be discussed in a companion paper from the perspective of energetics.

Full access
Chie Yokoyama, Yukari N. Takayabu, and Takeshi Horinouchi

Abstract

A quasi-stationary front, called the baiu front, often appears during the early-summer rainy season in East Asia (baiu in Japan). The present study examines how precipitation characteristics during the baiu season are determined by the large-scale environment, using satellite observation three-dimensional precipitation data. Emphasis is placed on the effect of subtropical jet (STJ) and lower-tropospheric convective instability (LCI).

A rainband appears together with a deep moisture convergence to the south of the STJ. Two types of mesoscale rainfall events (REs; contiguous rainfall areas), which are grouped by the stratiform precipitation ratio (SPR; stratiform precipitation over total precipitation), are identified: moderately stratiform REs (SPR of 0%–80%) representing tropical organized precipitation systems and highly stratiform REs (SPR of 80%–100%) representing midlatitude precipitation systems associated with extratropical cyclones. As the STJ becomes strong, rainfall from both types of mesoscale precipitation systems increases, with a distinct eastward extension of a midtropospheric moist region. In contrast, small systems appear regardless of the STJ, with high dependency on the LCI.

The results indicate that the STJ plays a role in moistening the midtroposphere owing to ascent associated with secondary circulation to the south of the STJ, producing environments favorable for organized precipitation systems in the southern part of the rainband. The horizontal moisture flux convergence may also contribute to precipitation just along the STJ. On the other hand, the LCI plays a role in generating shallow convection. In high-LCI conditions, deep convection can occur without the aid of mesoscale organization.

Full access