Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 15 items for

  • Author or Editor: ARTHUR F. KRUEGER x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
ARTHUR F. KRUEGER

Abstract

No Abstract Available.

Full access

THE WEATHER AND CIRCULATION OF APRIL 1955

Another Cold Month in the West

ARTHUR F. KRUEGER

Abstract

No Abstract Available.

Full access

THE WEATHER AND CIRCULATION OF JULY 1956

Including Some Aspects of Momentum Flux in Relation to an Intense Polar Vortex

ARTHUR F. KRUEGER

Abstract

No Abstract Available.

Full access
Arthur F. Krueger

Abstract

No abstract available.

Full access
ARTHUR F. KRUEGER

Abstract

No Abstract Available.

Full access

THE WEATHER AND CIRCULATION OF FEBRUARY 1954

The Warmest February on Record for the United States

ARTHUR F. KRUEGER

Abstract

No Abstract Available.

Full access

THE WEATHER AND CIRCULATION OF OCTOBER 1954

Including a Discussion of Hurricane Hazel in Relation to the Large-scale Circulation

ARTHUR F. KRUEGER

Abstract

No Abstract Available.

Full access

THE WEATHER AND CIRCULATION OF DECEMBER 1954

A Month With a Cyclonic Polar Vortex and Fast Westerlies in High Latitudes

ARTHUR F. KRUEGER

Abstract

No Abstract Available.

Full access
JAY S. WINSTON and ARTHUR F. KRUEGER

Abstract

A large-scale cycle of available potential energy in the Northern Hemisphere over a period of about two weeks during late December 1958 and early January 1950 has been investigated in some detail. During this cycle the zonal available potential energy first built up strongly to a maximum, and then when it began to decline, increases in eddy available and eddy kinetic energy took place. These changes in the energy parameters were well related to variations in the poleward heat transport, large values of which signify substantial conversions from zonal to eddy available potential energy, and to variations in the conversion between potential and kinetic energy. Furthermore some estimates of the generation of available potential energy show good consistency with the available potential energy variations. Examination of this cycle of available potential energy on a regional basis indicates that it was almost completely dominated by developments over North America and vicinity. The synoptic events associated with this energy cycle are also illustrated.

Full access
Arthur F. Krueger and Jay S. Winston

Abstract

The contrasting circulation and cloudiness over the tropics during two extremes of the zonally oriented Walker circulation are described. During February 1971 the trade winds over the Pacific Ocean were very strong with fast upper tropospheric westerlies superimposed. This was associated with well-developed, high-level oceanic troughs over the east central Pacific both north and south of the equator. Tropical convection was largely confined to the three tropical continental areas, while the ITCZ over the Pacific was very weak.

During February 1969 the Walker circulation was considerably weaker. Tropical convection was more extensive over the central and eastern Pacific. The high-level mid-oceanic troughs were also weaker and even replaced by weak anticyclonic flow over the convective regions. Associated with this the sub-tropical jet stream was very much stronger over the eastern Pacific, North America and the Atlantic, but weaker near Japan.

It is suggested that dynamic instability in the westerlies of the subtropical jet stream plays an important role in regulating the intensity of the tropical circulation.

Full access