Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: Andrew Burton x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Hubert Quetelard, Pierre Bessemoulin, Randall S. Cerveny, Thomas C. Peterson, Andrew Burton, and Yadowsun Boodhoo

Abstract

The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Commission for Climatology (CCl) evaluation process is applied to two extreme rainfall records occurring at Cratère Commerson on La Réunion Island during the passage of the major Tropical Cyclone (TC) Gamede for inclusion into the WMO CCl World Weather and Climate Extremes Archive. In February 2007, TC Gamede made two approaches to La Réunion Island as it traversed a rather complex path in the Indian Ocean. Gamede's main feature was massive rainfall accumulation inland, with several 3- and 4-day rainfall totals exceeding 2 m. Specifically, an extreme rainfall rate of 3,929 mm over 72 h was recorded at Cratère Commerson, well above the previous world record of 3,240 mm that had been measured at Grand-Ilet during TC Hyacinthe in 1980. In addition, the Cratère Commerson rain gauge registered a rainfall total of 4,869 mm over 4 days; also well above the previous world record. The evaluation committee found that consistent regional rainfall measurements, reliable calibrated equipment, and correct recording procedures were followed throughout the event. Problems with potential wind-induced measurement errors were discussed, but the committee consensus is that such errors tend to underestimate rather than overestimate rainfall accumulations. As shown by analysis of this event, the validation process for the WMO CCl Weather and Climate Extremes Archive provides essential documentation and certification for weather extremes across the world.

Full access
Christopher Velden, Bruce Harper, Frank Wells, John L. Beven II, Ray Zehr, Timothy Olander, Max Mayfield, Charles“Chip” Guard, Mark Lander, Roger Edson, Lixion Avila, Andrew Burton, Mike Turk, Akihiro Kikuchi, Adam Christian, Philippe Caroff, and Paul McCrone
Full access
Christopher Velden, Bruce Harper, Frank Wells, John L. Beven II, Ray Zehr, Timothy Olander, Max Mayfield, Charles “CHIP” Guard, Mark Lander, Roger Edson, Lixion Avila, Andrew Burton, Mike Turk, Akihiro Kikuchi, Adam Christian, Philippe Caroff, and Paul McCrone

The history of meteorology has taught us that weather analysis and prediction usually advances by a series of small, progressive studies. Occasionally, however, a special body of work can accelerate this process. When that work pertains to high-impact weather events that can affect large populations, it is especially notable. In this paper we review the contributions by Vernon F. Dvorak, whose innovations using satellite observations of cloud patterns fundamentally enhanced the ability to monitor tropical cyclones on a global scale. We discuss how his original technique has progressed, and the ways in which new spaceborne instruments are being employed to complement Dvorak's original visions.

Full access
Diana Greenslade, Mark Hemer, Alex Babanin, Ryan Lowe, Ian Turner, Hannah Power, Ian Young, Daniel Ierodiaconou, Greg Hibbert, Greg Williams, Saima Aijaz, João Albuquerque, Stewart Allen, Michael Banner, Paul Branson, Steve Buchan, Andrew Burton, John Bye, Nick Cartwright, Amin Chabchoub, Frank Colberg, Stephanie Contardo, Francois Dufois, Craig Earl-Spurr, David Farr, Ian Goodwin, Jim Gunson, Jeff Hansen, David Hanslow, Mitchell Harley, Yasha Hetzel, Ron Hoeke, Nicole Jones, Michael Kinsela, Qingxiang Liu, Oleg Makarynskyy, Hayden Marcollo, Said Mazaheri, Jason McConochie, Grant Millar, Tim Moltmann, Neal Moodie, Joao Morim, Russel Morison, Jana Orszaghova, Charitha Pattiaratchi, Andrew Pomeroy, Roger Proctor, David Provis, Ruth Reef, Dirk Rijnsdorp, Martin Rutherford, Eric Schulz, Jake Shayer, Kristen Splinter, Craig Steinberg, Darrell Strauss, Greg Stuart, Graham Symonds, Karina Tarbath, Daniel Taylor, James Taylor, Darshani Thotagamuwage, Alessandro Toffoli, Alireza Valizadeh, Jonathan van Hazel, Guilherme Vieira da Silva, Moritz Wandres, Colin Whittaker, David Williams, Gundula Winter, Jiangtao Xu, Aihong Zhong, and Stefan Zieger

Abstract

The Australian marine research, industry, and stakeholder community has recently undertaken an extensive collaborative process to identify the highest national priorities for wind-waves research. This was undertaken under the auspices of the Forum for Operational Oceanography Surface Waves Working Group. The main steps in the process were first, soliciting possible research questions from the community via an online survey; second, reviewing the questions at a face-to-face workshop; and third, online ranking of the research questions by individuals. This process resulted in 15 identified priorities, covering research activities and the development of infrastructure. The top five priorities are 1) enhanced and updated nearshore and coastal bathymetry; 2) improved understanding of extreme sea states; 3) maintain and enhance the in situ buoy network; 4) improved data access and sharing; and 5) ensemble and probabilistic wave modeling and forecasting. In this paper, each of the 15 priorities is discussed in detail, providing insight into why each priority is important, and the current state of the art, both nationally and internationally, where relevant. While this process has been driven by Australian needs, it is likely that the results will be relevant to other marine-focused nations.

Free access
Diana Greenslade, Mark Hemer, Alex Babanin, Ryan Lowe, Ian Turner, Hannah Power, Ian Young, Daniel Ierodiaconou, Greg Hibbert, Greg Williams, Saima Aijaz, João Albuquerque, Stewart Allen, Michael Banner, Paul Branson, Steve Buchan, Andrew Burton, John Bye, Nick Cartwright, Amin Chabchoub, Frank Colberg, Stephanie Contardo, Francois Dufois, Craig Earl-Spurr, David Farr, Ian Goodwin, Jim Gunson, Jeff Hansen, David Hanslow, Mitchell Harley, Yasha Hetzel, Ron Hoeke, Nicole Jones, Michael Kinsela, Qingxiang Liu, Oleg Makarynskyy, Hayden Marcollo, Said Mazaheri, Jason McConochie, Grant Millar, Tim Moltmann, Neal Moodie, Joao Morim, Russel Morison, Jana Orszaghova, Charitha Pattiaratchi, Andrew Pomeroy, Roger Proctor, David Provis, Ruth Reef, Dirk Rijnsdorp, Martin Rutherford, Eric Schulz, Jake Shayer, Kristen Splinter, Craig Steinberg, Darrell Strauss, Greg Stuart, Graham Symonds, Karina Tarbath, Daniel Taylor, James Taylor, Darshani Thotagamuwage, Alessandro Toffoli, Alireza Valizadeh, Jonathan van Hazel, Guilherme Vieira da Silva, Moritz Wandres, Colin Whittaker, David Williams, Gundula Winter, Jiangtao Xu, Aihong Zhong, and Stefan Zieger
Full access