Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 20 items for

  • Author or Editor: B. Haurwitz x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search
B. Haurwitz
Full access
Full access
B. Haurwitz

Abstract

It is shown that perturbations forming at wind discontinuities in the atmospheres of rotating planets are unstable, even though the distribution of the angular momentum of the rotating planet exerts a stabilizing influence. Consequently disturbances can develop spontaneously. Presumably at least some of the markings observed on planets, especially on Jupiter, represent such disturbances. The velocity of these perturbations is found not to differ greatly from the mean velocity of the fluid on both sides of the boundary. Therefore, the determination of planetary velocities of rotation from visual observations of such surface markings appears justified.

At a sharp current discontinuity the amplitude of a perturbation increases faster, the shorter the wave length. At shear zones of finite width only those waves are unstable whose length is greater than five times the width of the shear zone, and those waves will develop most rapidly whose length is about eight times the width of the shear zone. Since in the large-scale atmospheric circulations different wind belts are as a rule separated by finite shear zones rather than by sharp discontinuities very short waves cannot develop because they are not unstable. An empirical check of the relation between the width of the shear zone and the length of the developing perturbations is discussed.

Full access
B. Haurwitz
Full access
B. Haurwitz
Full access
B. Haurwitz

Abstract

No Abstract Available

Full access
B. HAURWITZ

Abstract

No Abstract Available.

Full access
B. Haurwitz

Abstract

It is shown on the evidence of observational material that the simplifications necessary in order to derive the equation for the isallobaric wind are not justified, because the neglected terms in the equations of motion, viz., the convective terms and the local derivatives of the geostrophic deviation, are of the same order of magnitude as the terms retained in the equations. Hence the concept of the isallobaric wind has to be abandoned. Consequently the convergence ahead of moving cyclones and the divergence behind, in the lower troposphere, cannot be explained by means of the isallobaric-wind relation. It is shown that the distribution of the acceleration of motion in moving pressure systems offers an explanation of the observed distribution of convergence and divergence.

Full access
B. Haurwitz

Abstract

No Abstract Available

Full access
B. Haurwitz

Abstract

No Abstract Available

Full access