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B. M. VARNEY

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B. M. VARNEY

Abstract

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B. M. VARNEY

Abstract

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B. M. VARNEY

Abstract

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B. M. VARNEY

Abstract

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B. M. VARNEY

Abstract

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B. M. Varney
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B. M. VARNEY

Abstract

SYNOPSIS

Study of the precipitation data for a series of stations across the central Sierra Nevada of California indicates that the rate of increase of precipitation with altitude throughout the year in a well-defined progression from smallest rate in summer to greatest in winter. Similarly, the rates of decrease in the zone above the level of maximum precipitation, and in the zone from the summit down the leeward slope are smallest in midsummer and greatest in midwinter.

It is suggested that the observed seasonal variations are probably the result of seasonal differences in the relative humidity of the air currents involved and that, if this be true, well marked seasonal variations in the precipitation-altitude relation may be a general characteristic of regions having pronounced wet and dry seasons.

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B. M. VARNEY

Abstract

SYNOPSIS

An unusual example of wind turbulence in the daytime air stream in mountain valleys is found near Yosemite Valley, Calif. The stream as it flows east up the valley in the afternoon divides through two branch canyons, the current in the southeasterly branch turning sharply round a steep mountain spur. This spur and the configuration of the canyon walls sets up a rotation of air in the lee of the cliffs about an inched axis, the lower end of which is at the spur, the upper end about a mile away to the east, the general trend being parallel to the side of the canyon. The path of an air particle near the periphery of this roll was found, by observations on the drift of tissue papers, to be that of a great spiral, the diameter of which seems to vary from nothing at the spur to perhaps 2,000 feet at the east end. Observed variations in the form of the spiral are due to changes in the local winds under the influence of topography.

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B. M. VARNEY

Abstract

No Abstract Available.

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