Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: Barbara C. Farhar x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search
Barbara C. Farhar

Abstract

Public response to South Dakota's operational cloud seeding program (SDWMP) has been traced since before its implementation. Data are presented from interviews conducted at the end of each of the program's first two operational seasons. Variables included are respondent 1) attitudes toward weather modification, 2) beliefs that it is effective in increasing precipitation and suppressing hail, 3) sources of information about the SDWMP, 4) knowledge about the weather modification program, 5) evaluation of cloud seeding programs, and 6) preferred decision making and funding for the program. The dependent variable is evaluation of programs; relationships among the variables are described. The impact of the Rapid City flood on opinion about weather modification in South Dakota is summarized.

Full access
Barbara C. Farhar

Prior to the Rapid City flood of 9 June 1972, a panel of South Dakota respondents had participated in a sociological survey on opinion about weather modification. The panel was reinterviewed after the event. Findings show that most respondents were aware that cloud seeding had occurred prior to the flood, that the majority did not attribute the flood to cloud seeding, that Rapid City area residents were no more likely than other respondents to attribute a causal link, and that the perception of the disaster as man-made is associated with increased awareness and belief that the technology is effective and decreased favorability toward the technology and toward programs. No organized opposition to weather modification has occurred in South Dakota since the flood.

Full access
Barbara C. Farhar

Abstract

The paper addresses four areas of concern relevant to a national policy on weather modification (being developed this year). These are 1) research policy issues, 2) public policy issues, 3) public response to weather modification and 4) suggested action on the identified issues.

Some of the problems discussed include inadequacies of state regulation of weather modification, limitations of current federal regulation, interstate and international concerns, water rights issues, lack of evaluation of operational projects, lack of scientific consensus and the desirability of a lead agency at the federal level.

Several recommendations for action at the federal level are presented.

Full access
Barbara C. Farhar and Julia Mewes

Abstract

A three-year sociological study has focused on a comparison of public response and decision-making processes with reference to weather modification projects in a number of states. Weather modification is currently subject to legislative regulation in 29 states. Selected characteristics of these state laws are examined as relevant aspects of decision-making contexts for the technology. Existence of such legislative specifications as requirements for licenses, permits, and/or environmental impact statements, and provision for public involvement in decision making, advisory committees, tax fund allocations, liability and water rights, are described. These characteristics are compared to occurrences of public support or opposition in project areas. The effect of state legislative regulations on implementation of proposed projects is also discussed. It is anticipated that the relationships which emerge from the analysis will have implications for future developments in public policy with regard to weather modification.

Full access
Lynn A. Sherretz and Barbara C. Farhar

Abstract

Analysis of METROMEX rainfall data and traffic accident reports for seven southern Illinois cities within the area of the St. Louis precipitation anomaly revealed a statistically significant increase in the number of accidents reported during rainy periods compared to non-rainy periods in each city. When observations for the cities were combined, a statistically significant linear trend between mean number of accidents and amount of rainfall was identified. A measure of accident severity, computed by the mean number of injuries for each accident, increased in some of the cities when it rained but decreased in others. None of these increases or decreases were statistically significant. It is speculated that the St. Louis precipitation anomaly probably results in an increase in the occurrence of traffic accidents in the area of its effect.

Full access