Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 20 items for

  • Author or Editor: Bertrand Chapron x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Vladimir Kudryavtsev
and
Bertrand Chapron

Abstract

The wave generation model based on the rapid distortion concept significantly underestimates empirical values of the wave growth rate. As suggested before, inclusion of the aerodynamic roughness modulations effect on the amplitude of the slope-correlated surface pressure could potentially reconcile this model approach with observations. This study explores the role of short-scale breaking modulations to amplify the growth rate of modulating longer waves. As developed, airflow separations from modulated breaking waves result in strong modulations of the turbulent stress in the inner region of the modulating waves. In turn, this leads to amplifying the slope-correlated surface pressure anomalies. As evaluated, such a mechanism can be very efficient for enhancing the wind-wave growth rate by a factor of 2–3.

Full access
Valentin Resseguier
,
Bertrand Chapron
, and
Etienne Mémin

Abstract

Ocean eddies play an important role in the transport of heat, salt, nutrients, or pollutants. During a finite-time advection, the gradients of these tracers can increase or decrease, depending on a growth rate and the angle between flow gradients and initial tracer gradients. The growth rate is directly related to finite-time Lyapunov exponents. Numerous studies on mixing and/or tracer downscaling methods rely on satellite altimeter-derived ocean velocities. Filtering most oceanic small-scale eddies, the resulting smooth Eulerian velocities are often stationary during the characteristic time of tracer gradient growth. While smooth, these velocity fields are still locally misaligned, and thus uncorrelated, to many coarse-scale tracer observations amendable to downscaling [e.g., sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface salinity (SSS)]. Using finite-time advections, the averaged squared norm of tracer gradients can then only increase, with local growth rate independent of the initial coarse-scale tracer distribution. The key mixing processes are then only governed by locally uniform shears and foldings around stationary convective cells. To predict the tracer deformations and the evolution of their second-order statistics, an efficient proxy is proposed. Applied to a single velocity snapshot, this proxy extends the Okubo–Weiss criterion. For the Lagrangian-advection-based downscaling methods, it further successfully predicts the evolution of tracer spectral energy density after a finite time, and the optimal time to stop the downscaling operation. A practical estimation can then be proposed to define an effective parameterization of the horizontal eddy diffusivity.

Significance Statement

An analytical formalism is adopted to derive new exact and approximate relations that express the clustering of tracers transported by upper-ocean flows. This formalism bridges previous Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches. Accordingly, for slow and smooth upper-ocean flows, a rapid prognosis estimate can solely be performed using single-time velocity field observations. Well suited to satellite-altimeter measurements, it will help rapidly identify and monitor mixing regions occurring in the vicinity of ocean eddy boundaries.

Restricted access
Yves Quilfen
,
Bertrand Chapron
, and
Jean Tournadre

Abstract

Sea surface estimates of local winds, waves, and rain-rate conditions are crucial to complement infrared/visible satellite images in estimating the strength of tropical cyclones (TCs). Satellite measurements at microwave frequencies are thus key elements of present and future observing systems. Available for more than 20 years, passive microwave measurements are very valuable but still suffer from insufficient resolution and poor wind vector retrievals in the rainy conditions encountered in and around tropical cyclones. Scatterometer and synthetic aperture radar active microwave measurements performed at the C and Ku band on board the European Remote Sensing (ERS), the Meteorological Operational (MetOp), the Quick Scatterometer (QuikSCAT), the Environmental Satellite (Envisat), and RadarSat satellites can also be used to map the surface wind field in storms. Their accuracy is limited in the case of heavy rain and possible saturation of the microwave signals is reported. Altimeter dual-frequency measurements have also been shown to provide along-track information related to surface wind speed, wave height, and vertically integrated rain rate at about 6-km resolution. Although limited for operational use by their dimensional sampling, the dual-frequency capability makes altimeters a unique satellite-borne sensor to perform measurements of key surface parameters in a consistent way. To illustrate this capability two Jason-1 altimeter passes over Hurricanes Isabel and Wilma are examined. The area of maximum TC intensity, as described by the National Hurricane Center and by the altimeter, is compared for these two cases. Altimeter surface wind speed and rainfall-rate observations are further compared with measurements performed by other remote sensors, namely, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission instruments and the airborne Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer.

Full access
Jean Tournadre
,
Bertrand Chapron
, and
Nicolas Reul

Abstract

This paper presents a new method to analyze high-resolution altimeter waveforms in terms of surface backscatter. Over the ocean, a basic assumption of modeling altimeter echo waveforms is to consider a homogeneous sea surface within the altimeter footprint that can be described by a mean backscatter coefficient. When the surface backscatter varies strongly at scales smaller than the altimeter footprint size, such as in the presence of surface slicks, rain, small islands, and altimeter echoes can be interpreted as high-resolution images of the surface whose geometry is annular and not rectangular. A method based on the computation of the imaging matrix and its pseudoinverse to infer the surface backscatter at high resolution (~300 m) from the measured waveforms is presented. The method is tested using synthetic waveforms for different surface backscatter fields and is shown to be unbiased and accurate. Several applications can be foreseen to refine the analysis of rain patterns, surface slicks, and lake surfaces. The authors choose here to focus on the small-scale variability of backscatter induced by a submerged reef smaller than the altimeter footprint as the function of tide, significant wave height, and wind.

Full access
Douglas Vandemark
,
James B. Edson
, and
Bertrand Chapron

Abstract

Aircraft altimeter and in situ measurements are used to examine relationships between altimeter backscatter and the magnitude of near-surface wind and friction velocities. Comparison of altimeter radar cross section with wind speed is made through the modified Chelton–Wentz algorithm. Improved agreement is found after correcting 10-m winds for both surface current and atmospheric stability. An altimeter friction velocity algorithm is derived based on the wind speed model and an open-ocean drag coefficient. Close agreement between altimeter- and in situ–derived friction velocities is found. For this dataset, quality of the altimeter inversion to surface friction velocity is comparable to that for adjusted winds and clearly better than the inversion to true 10-m wind speed.

Full access
Fabrice Ardhuin
,
Bertrand Chapron
, and
Tanos Elfouhaily

Abstract

The influence of waves on the mean flow is derived on a rotating earth in the form of interaction stresses and a mass flux in the averaged momentum balance and mass conservation equations, respectively, using Hasselmann's formalism and keeping only the vertical component f of the Coriolis parameter. These stresses, easily computed from a spectral wave model, arise from both spatial gradients in the wave field and the bufferlike role of waves that store a small fraction of the air–sea momentum flux in the initial growth stages (young seas) and restore this momentum to the mean currents, atmosphere, or solid earth when wave energy is dissipated. The practical importance of these wave-induced stresses on the depth-integrated mean circulation is evaluated from wind-wave growth curves and a third-generation spectral wave model. In steady conditions, waves are shown to induce stresses opposed to the wind stress for wave growth stages that may represent up to 10% of the wind stress for short fetches. Assuming simple mean flow responses, wave-induced stresses shall translate into mean sea level variations, which are typically less than 1 mm in the middle of ocean basins but are much larger and significant in shallow areas like continental shelves. The present formulation is consistent with previous studies on wave-driven inertial oscillations and nearshore circulation, cases for which wave effects are known to be much stronger.

Full access
Amanda M. Plagge
,
Douglas Vandemark
, and
Bertrand Chapron

Abstract

A 5-yr dataset collected over two surface current and meteorological moorings allows rigorous evaluation of questions surrounding wave–current interaction and the scatterometer. Results demonstrate that scatterometer winds represent winds relative to the moving sea surface, affirming previous observational efforts that inferred the phenomenon using climatological approaches over larger time and space scales in equatorial and western boundary currents. Comparisons of wind residuals between Ku-band Quick Scatterometer (QuikSCAT) and buoy measurements show nearly one-to-one correlations with ocean surface velocity for 5-, 12.5-, and 25-km resolution wind speed products, especially under conditions of moderate wind speed and near-neutral atmospheric stability. Scatterometer and buoy wind direction differences due to currents were observed to be negligible for the range of surface velocities encountered and the length scales observed by QuikSCAT. Similar analyses are applied to C-band Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) satellite wind measurements at the same sites, as well as to satellite altimeter winds, and overall confirm the results seen with QuikSCAT; differences are likely the combined result of sampling, satellite wind algorithms, and geophysical wind–wave coupling in the presence of currents. On the whole, this study affirms that at length scales of 10 km and longer the scatterometer wind can be considered to be current relative. Observed differences between earth-relative and current-relative winds of order 10%–20% of the wind velocity are not uncommon in this and other ocean regions and this study more fully validates that microwave remote sensing winds appear to respond to wind stress even in the presence of larger-scale currents.

Full access
Nicolas Rascle
,
Frederic Nouguier
,
Bertrand Chapron
,
Alexis Mouche
, and
Aurélien Ponte

Abstract

At times, high-resolution images of sea surface roughness can provide stunning details of submesoscale upper-ocean dynamics. As interpreted, transformations of short-scale wind waves by horizontal current gradients are responsible for those spectacular observations. Those observations could prove particularly useful to validate numerical ocean models that reach increasingly high resolutions. Focusing on surface roughness at optical wavelengths, two steps have recently been performed in that direction. First, it was shown in a previous paper by Rascle et al. that surface roughness variations not only trace surface current divergence but also other characteristics of the current gradient tensor, mainly the strain in the wind direction. The wind direction with respect to the current gradient thus stands out as an important interpretative parameter. The second step is the purpose of the present paper, where the effect of the viewing direction is investigated. To this end, the authors discuss pairs of quasi-simultaneous sun-glitter images, taken from different satellite positions, to provide different viewing configurations, namely, quasi-orthogonal azimuth angles at similar zenith angles. As evidenced, upwind and crosswind viewing observations can be markedly different. As further confirmed with idealized numerical simulations, this anisotropy well traces anisotropic surface current areas, while more isotropic contrasts likely trace areas dominated by surface divergence conditions. These findings suggest the potential to directly separate divergence from other deformations by using high-resolution roughness observations at multiple azimuth view angles.

Full access
Werner Bauer
,
Pranav Chandramouli
,
Bertrand Chapron
,
Long Li
, and
Etienne Mémin

Abstract

An important open question in fluid dynamics concerns the effect of small scales in structuring a fluid flow. In oceanic or atmospheric flows, this is aptly captured in wave–current interactions through the study of the well-known Langmuir secondary circulation. Such wave–current interactions are described by the Craik–Leibovich system, in which the action of a wave-induced velocity, the Stokes drift, produces a so-called “vortex force” that causes streaking in the flow. In this work, we show that these results can be generalized as a generic effect of the spatial inhomogeneity of the statistical properties of the small-scale flow components. As demonstrated, this is well captured through a stochastic representation of the flow.

Free access
Nicolas Rascle
,
Bertrand Chapron
,
Aurélien Ponte
,
Fabrice Ardhuin
, and
Patrice Klein

Abstract

Images of sea surface roughness—for example, obtained by synthetic aperture radars (SAR) or by radiometers viewing areas in and around the sun glitter—at times provide clear observations of meso- and submesoscale oceanic features. Interacting with the surface wind waves, particular deformation properties of surface currents are responsible for those manifestations. Ignoring other sources of surface roughness variations, the authors limit their discussion to the mean square slope (mss) variability. This study confirms that vortical currents and currents with shear in the wind direction shall not be expressed in surface roughness images. Only divergent currents or currents with no divergence but strained in the wind direction can exhibit surface roughness signatures. More specifically, nondivergent currents might be traced with a 45° sensitivity to the wind direction. A simple method is proposed in order to interpret high-resolution roughness images, where roughness variations are proportional to ∂u/∂x + αυ/∂y, a linear combination of the along-wind and crosswind current gradients. The polarization parameter α depends upon the sensor look direction and the directional properties of the surface waves selected by the sensor. The use of multiple look directions or possible acquisitions with different wind directions shall thus help to retrieve surface currents from surface roughness observations.

Full access