Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Binh Pham x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search
Binh Pham-Duc, Catherine Prigent, Filipe Aires, and Fabrice Papa

Abstract

Continental surface water extents and dynamics are key information to model Earth’s hydrological and biochemical cycles. This study presents global and regional comparisons between two multisatellite surface water extent datasets, the Global Inundation Extent from Multi-Satellites (GIEMS) and the Surface Water Microwave Product Series (SWAMPS), for the 1993–2007 period, along with two widely used static inundation datasets, the Global Lakes and Wetlands Database (GLWD) and the Matthews and Fung wetland estimates. Maximum surface water extents derived from these datasets are largely different: ~13 × 106 km2 from GLWD, ~5.3 × 106 km2 from Matthews and Fung, ~6.2 × 106 km2 from GIEMS, and ~10.3 × 106 km2 from SWAMPS. SWAMPS global maximum surface extent reduces by nearly 51% (to ~5 × 106 km2) when applying a coastal filter, showing a strong contamination in this retrieval over the coastal regions. Anomalous surface waters are also detected with SWAMPS over desert areas. The seasonal amplitude of the GIEMS surface waters is much larger than the SWAMPS estimates, and GIEMS dynamics is more consistent with other hydrological variables such as the river discharge. Over the Amazon basin, GIEMS and SWAMPS show a very high time series correlation (95%), but with SWAMPS maximum extent half the size of that from GIEMS and from previous synthetic aperture radar estimates. Over the Niger basin, SWAMPS seasonal cycle is out of phase with both GIEMS and MODIS-derived water extent estimates, as well as with river discharge data.

Full access
Filipe Aires, Léo Miolane, Catherine Prigent, Binh Pham, Etienne Fluet-Chouinard, Bernhard Lehner, and Fabrice Papa

Abstract

A new procedure is introduced to downscale low-spatial-resolution inundation extents from Global Inundation Extent from Multi-Satellites (GIEMS) to a 3-arc-s (90 m) dataset (known as GIEMS-D3). The methodology is based on topography and hydrography information from the HydroSHEDS database. A new floodability index is introduced and an innovative smoothing procedure is developed to ensure a smooth transition, in the high-resolution maps, between the low-resolution boxes from GIEMS. Topography information is pertinent for natural hydrology environments controlled by elevation but is more limited in human-modified basins. However, the proposed downscaling approach is compatible with forthcoming fusion of other, more pertinent satellite information in these difficult regions. The resulting GIEMS-D3 database is the only high-spatial-resolution inundation database available globally at a monthly time scale over the 1993–2007 period. GIEMS-D3 is assessed by analyzing its spatial and temporal variability and evaluated by comparisons to other independent satellite observations from visible (Google Earth and Landsat), infrared (MODIS), and active microwave (synthetic aperture radar).

Full access