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  • Author or Editor: Bryan E. Fabbri x
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Giuseppe Zibordi
,
Frédéric Mélin
,
Jean-François Berthon
,
Brent Holben
,
Ilya Slutsker
,
David Giles
,
Davide D’Alimonte
,
Doug Vandemark
,
Hui Feng
,
Gregory Schuster
,
Bryan E. Fabbri
,
Seppo Kaitala
, and
Jukka Seppälä

Abstract

The ocean color component of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET-OC) has been implemented to support long-term satellite ocean color investigations through cross-site consistent and accurate measurements collected by autonomous radiometer systems deployed on offshore fixed platforms. The AERONET-OC data products are the normalized water-leaving radiances determined at various center wavelengths in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. These data complement atmospheric AERONET aerosol products, such as optical thickness, size distribution, single scattering albedo, and phase function. This work describes in detail this new AERONET component and its specific elements including measurement method, instrument calibration, processing scheme, quality assurance, uncertainties, data archive, and products accessibility. Additionally, the atmospheric and bio-optical features of the sites currently included in AERONET-OC are briefly summarized. After illustrating the application of AERONET-OC data to the validation of primary satellite products over a variety of complex coastal waters, recommendations are then provided for the identification of new deployment sites most suitable to support satellite ocean color missions.

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Charles K. Rutledge
,
Gregory L. Schuster
,
Thomas P. Charlock
,
Frederick M. Denn
,
William L. Smith Jr.
,
Bryan E. Fabbri
,
James J. Madigan Jr.
, and
Robert J. Knapp

When radiometers on satellites point toward Earth with the goal of sensing an important variable quantitatively, rather than just creating a pleasing image, the task at hand is often not simple. The electromagnetic energy detected by the radiometers is a puzzle of various signals; it must be solved to quantify the specific physical variable. This task, called the retrieval or remote-sensing process, is important to most satellite-based observation programs. It would be ideal to test the algorithms for retrieval processes in a sealed laboratory, where all the relevant parameters could be easily measured. The size and complexity of the Earth make this impractical. NASA's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project has done the next-best thing by developing a long-term radiation observation site over the ocean. The relatively low and homogeneous surface albedo of the ocean make this type of site a simpler environment for observing and validating radiation parameters from satellite-based instruments. To characterize components of the planet's energy budget, CERES uses a variety of retrievals associated with several satellite-based instruments onboard NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS). A new surface observation project called the CERES Ocean Validation Experiment (COVE), operating on a rigid ocean platform, is supplying data to validate some of these instruments and retrieval products. This article describes the ocean platform and the types of observations being performed there, and highlights of some scientific problems being addressed.

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