Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for

  • Author or Editor: C. Jakob x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Abhijit Chougule
,
Jakob Mann
,
Mark Kelly
, and
Gunner C. Larsen

Abstract

A spectral tensor model is presented for turbulent fluctuations of wind velocity components and temperature, assuming uniform vertical gradients in mean temperature and mean wind speed. The model is built upon rapid distortion theory (RDT) following studies by Mann and by Hanazaki and Hunt, using the eddy lifetime parameterization of Mann to make the model stationary. The buoyant spectral tensor model is driven via five parameters: the viscous dissipation rate ε, length scale of energy-containing eddies L, a turbulence anisotropy parameter , gradient Richardson number (Ri) representing the local atmospheric stability, and the rate of destruction of temperature variance . Model output includes velocity and temperature spectra and associated cospectra, including those of longitudinal and vertical temperature fluxes. The model also produces two-point statistics, such as coherences and phases of velocity components and temperature. The statistics of uniformly sheared and stratified turbulence from the model are compared with atmospheric observations taken from the Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (HATS) field program, and model results fit observed one-dimensional spectra quite well. For highly unstable stratification, however, the model has deficiencies at low wavenumbers that limit its prediction of longitudinal velocity component spectra at scales on the order of 0.6 km. The model predicts coherences well for horizontal separations but overestimates vertical coherence with increasing separation. Finally, it is shown that the RDT output can deviate from Monin–Obukhov similarity theory.

Full access
F. Chevallier
,
P. Bauer
,
G. Kelly
,
C. Jakob
, and
T. McNally

Abstract

Radiation observations are a key element in the evaluation of the 40-yr reanalysis at the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. This paper uses the High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder/2 (HIRS/2) and Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) observations on board the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellites, to assess the characteristics of the cloud fields produced by the forecasting system over midlatitude and tropical oceans. Infrared and microwave radiation have different sensitivities to clouds and are therefore complementary. Observed and model-generated radiances, as well as HIRS/2-derived cloud parameters, are compared.

The model clouds are shown to be well distributed, with realistic seasonal cycles. However, deficiencies are identified and discussed: the cloud radiative impact may be too low in the midlatitudes, the frequency of occurrence of high clouds is overestimated in the intertropical convergence zone, and the stratocumulus off the west coast of the continents is underestimated. The methods described here provide a framework for assessing the impact of forthcoming improvements to the cloud scheme.

Full access
K. D. Williams
,
A. Bodas-Salcedo
,
M. Déqué
,
S. Fermepin
,
B. Medeiros
,
M. Watanabe
,
C. Jakob
,
S. A. Klein
,
C. A. Senior
, and
D. L. Williamson

Abstract

The Transpose-Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) is an international model intercomparison project in which climate models are run in “weather forecast mode.” The Transpose-AMIP II experiment is run alongside phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) and allows processes operating in climate models to be evaluated, and the origin of climatological biases to be explored, by examining the evolution of the model from a state in which the large-scale dynamics, temperature, and humidity structures are constrained through use of common analyses.

The Transpose-AMIP II experimental design is presented. The project requests participants to submit a comprehensive set of diagnostics to enable detailed investigation of the models to be performed. An example of the type of analysis that may be undertaken using these diagnostics is illustrated through a study of the development of cloud biases over the Southern Ocean, a region that is problematic for many models. Several models share a climatological bias for too little reflected shortwave radiation from cloud across the region. This is found to mainly occur behind cold fronts and/or on the leading side of transient ridges and to be associated with more stable lower-tropospheric profiles. Investigation of a case study that is typical of the bias and associated meteorological conditions reveals the models to typically simulate cloud that is too optically and physically thin with an inversion that is too low. The evolution of the models within the first few hours suggests that these conditions are particularly sensitive and a positive feedback can develop between the thinning of the cloud layer and boundary layer structure.

Full access
C. N. Long
,
S. A. McFarlane
,
A. Del Genio
,
P. Minnis
,
T. P. Ackerman
,
J. Mather
,
J. Comstock
,
G. G. Mace
,
M. Jensen
, and
C. Jakob

The tropical western Pacific (TWP) is an important climatic region. Strong solar heating, warm sea surface temperatures, and the annual progression of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) across this region generate abundant convective systems, which through their effects on the heat and water budgets have a profound impact on global climate and precipitation. In order to accurately evaluate tropical cloud systems in models, measurements of tropical clouds, the environment in which they reside, and their impact on the radiation and water budgets are needed. Because of the remote location, ground-based datasets of cloud, atmosphere, and radiation properties from the TWP region have come primarily from shortterm field experiments. While providing extremely useful information on physical processes, these short-term datasets are limited in statistical and climatological information. To provide longterm measurements of the surface radiation budget in the tropics and the atmospheric properties that affect it, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program established a measurement site on Manus Island, Papua New Guinea, in 1996 and on the island republic of Nauru in late 1998. These sites provide unique datasets now available for more than 10 years on Manus and Nauru. This article presents examples of the scientific use of these datasets including characterization of cloud properties, analysis of cloud radiative forcing, model studies of tropical clouds and processes, and validation of satellite algorithms. New instrumentation recently installed at the Manus site will provide expanded opportunities for tropical atmospheric science.

Full access
B. F. Ryan
,
J. J. Katzfey
,
D. J. Abbs
,
C. Jakob
,
U. Lohmann
,
B. Rockel
,
L. D. Rotstayn
,
R. E. Stewart
,
K. K. Szeto
,
G. Tselioudis
, and
M. K. Yau

Abstract

The Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment has identified the poor representation of clouds in atmospheric general circulation models as one of the major impediments for the use of these models in reliably predicting future climate change. One of the most commonly encountered types of cloud system in midlatitudes is that associated with cyclones. The purpose of this study is to investigate the representation of frontal cloud systems in a hierarchy of models in order to identify their relative weaknesses. The hierarchy of models was classified according to the horizontal resolution: cloud-resolving models (5-km resolution), limited-area models (20-km resolution), coarse-grid single-column models (300 km), and an atmospheric general circulation model (>100 km). The models were evaluated using both in situ and satellite data.

The study shows, as expected, that the higher-resolution models give a more complete description of the front and capture many of the observed nonlinear features of the front. At the low resolution, the simulations are unable to capture the front accurately due to the lack of the nonlinear features seen in the high-resolution simulations. The model intercomparison identified problems in applying single-column models to rapidly advecting baroclinic systems. Mesoscale circulations driven by subgrid-scale dynamical, thermodynamical, and microphysical processes are identified as an important feedback mechanism linking the frontal circulations and the cloud field. Finally it is shown that the same techniques used to validate climatological studies with International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project data are also valid for case studies, thereby providing a methodology to generalize the single case studies to climatological studies.

Full access
J. Teixeira
,
S. Cardoso
,
M. Bonazzola
,
J. Cole
,
A. DelGenio
,
C. DeMott
,
C. Franklin
,
C. Hannay
,
C. Jakob
,
Y. Jiao
,
J. Karlsson
,
H. Kitagawa
,
M. Köhler
,
A. Kuwano-Yoshida
,
C. LeDrian
,
J. Li
,
A. Lock
,
M. J. Miller
,
P. Marquet
,
J. Martins
,
C. R. Mechoso
,
E. v. Meijgaard
,
I. Meinke
,
P. M. A. Miranda
,
D. Mironov
,
R. Neggers
,
H. L. Pan
,
D. A. Randall
,
P. J. Rasch
,
B. Rockel
,
W. B. Rossow
,
B. Ritter
,
A. P. Siebesma
,
P. M. M. Soares
,
F. J. Turk
,
P. A. Vaillancourt
,
A. Von Engeln
, and
M. Zhao

Abstract

A model evaluation approach is proposed in which weather and climate prediction models are analyzed along a Pacific Ocean cross section, from the stratocumulus regions off the coast of California, across the shallow convection dominated trade winds, to the deep convection regions of the ITCZ—the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Cloud System Study/Working Group on Numerical Experimentation (GCSS/WGNE) Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI). The main goal of GPCI is to evaluate and help understand and improve the representation of tropical and subtropical cloud processes in weather and climate prediction models. In this paper, a detailed analysis of cloud regime transitions along the cross section from the subtropics to the tropics for the season June–July–August of 1998 is presented. This GPCI study confirms many of the typical weather and climate prediction model problems in the representation of clouds: underestimation of clouds in the stratocumulus regime by most models with the corresponding consequences in terms of shortwave radiation biases; overestimation of clouds by the 40-yr ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA-40) in the deep tropics (in particular) with the corresponding impact in the outgoing longwave radiation; large spread between the different models in terms of cloud cover, liquid water path and shortwave radiation; significant differences between the models in terms of vertical cross sections of cloud properties (in particular), vertical velocity, and relative humidity. An alternative analysis of cloud cover mean statistics is proposed where sharp gradients in cloud cover along the GPCI transect are taken into account. This analysis shows that the negative cloud bias of some models and ERA-40 in the stratocumulus regions [as compared to the first International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP)] is associated not only with lower values of cloud cover in these regimes, but also with a stratocumulus-to-cumulus transition that occurs too early along the trade wind Lagrangian trajectory. Histograms of cloud cover along the cross section differ significantly between models. Some models exhibit a quasi-bimodal structure with cloud cover being either very large (close to 100%) or very small, while other models show a more continuous transition. The ISCCP observations suggest that reality is in-between these two extreme examples. These different patterns reflect the diverse nature of the cloud, boundary layer, and convection parameterizations in the participating weather and climate prediction models.

Full access
J. A. Curry
,
P. V. Hobbs
,
M. D. King
,
D. A. Randall
,
P. Minnis
,
G. A. Isaac
,
J. O. Pinto
,
T. Uttal
,
A. Bucholtz
,
D. G. Cripe
,
H. Gerber
,
C. W. Fairall
,
T. J. Garrett
,
J. Hudson
,
J. M. Intrieri
,
C. Jakob
,
T. Jensen
,
P. Lawson
,
D. Marcotte
,
L. Nguyen
,
P. Pilewskie
,
A. Rangno
,
D. C. Rogers
,
K. B. Strawbridge
,
F. P. J. Valero
,
A. G. Williams
, and
D. Wylie

An overview is given of the First ISCCP Regional Experiment Arctic Clouds Experiment that was conducted during April–July 1998. The principal goal of the field experiment was to gather the data needed to examine the impact of arctic clouds on the radiation exchange between the surface, atmosphere, and space, and to study how the surface influences the evolution of boundary layer clouds. The observations will be used to evaluate and improve climate model parameterizations of cloud and radiation processes, satellite remote sensing of cloud and surface characteristics, and understanding of cloud–radiation feedbacks in the Arctic. The experiment utilized four research aircraft that flew over surface-based observational sites in the Arctic Ocean and at Barrow, Alaska. This paper describes the programmatic and scientific objectives of the project, the experimental design (including research platforms and instrumentation), the conditions that were encountered during the field experiment, and some highlights of preliminary observations, modeling, and satellite remote sensing studies.

Full access