Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: C.E. Halliwell x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search
P. A. Clark, C. E. Halliwell, and D. L. A. Flack

Abstract

We present a simple, physically consistent stochastic boundary layer scheme implemented in the Met Office’s Unified Model. It is expressed as temporally correlated multiplicative Poisson noise with a distribution that depends on physical scales. The distribution can be highly skewed at convection-permitting scales (horizontal grid lengths around 1 km) when temporal correlation is far more important than spatial. The scheme is evaluated using small ensemble forecasts of two case studies of severe convective storms over the United Kingdom. Perturbations are temporally correlated over an eddy-turnover time scale, and may be similar in magnitude to or larger than the mean boundary layer forcing. However, their mean is zero and hence they, in practice, they have very little impact on the energetics of the forecast, so overall domain-averaged precipitation, for example, is essentially unchanged. Differences between ensemble members grow; after around 12 h they appear to be roughly saturated; this represents the time scale to achieve a balance between addition of new perturbations, perturbation growth, and dissipation, not just saturation of initial perturbations. The scheme takes into account the area chosen to average over, and results are insensitive to this area at least where this remains within an order of magnitude of the grid scale.

Open access
Thorwald H. M. Stein, Robin J. Hogan, Peter A. Clark, Carol E. Halliwell, Kirsty E. Hanley, Humphrey W. Lean, John C. Nicol, and Robert S. Plant

Abstract

A new frontier in weather forecasting is emerging by operational forecast models now being run at convection-permitting resolutions at many national weather services. However, this is not a panacea; significant systematic errors remain in the character of convective storms and rainfall distributions. The Dynamical and Microphysical Evolution of Convective Storms (DYMECS) project is taking a fundamentally new approach to evaluate and improve such models: rather than relying on a limited number of cases, which may not be representative, the authors have gathered a large database of 3D storm structures on 40 convective days using the Chilbolton radar in southern England. They have related these structures to storm life cycles derived by tracking features in the rainfall from the U.K. radar network and compared them statistically to storm structures in the Met Office model, which they ran at horizontal grid length between 1.5 km and 100 m, including simulations with different subgrid mixing length. The authors also evaluated the scale and intensity of convective updrafts using a new radar technique. They find that the horizontal size of simulated convective storms and the updrafts within them is much too large at 1.5-km resolution, such that the convective mass flux of individual updrafts can be too large by an order of magnitude. The scale of precipitation cores and updrafts decreases steadily with decreasing grid lengths, as does the typical storm lifetime. The 200-m grid-length simulation with standard mixing length performs best over all diagnostics, although a greater mixing length improves the representation of deep convective storms.

Full access
Thorwald H. M. Stein, Robin J. Hogan, Kirsty E. Hanley, John C. Nicol, Humphrey W. Lean, Robert S. Plant, Peter A. Clark, and Carol E. Halliwell

Abstract

A set of high-resolution radar observations of convective storms has been collected to evaluate such storms in the Met Office Unified Model during the Dynamical and Microphysical Evolution of Convective Storms (DYMECS) project. The 3-GHz Chilbolton Advanced Meteorological Radar was set up with a scan-scheduling algorithm to automatically track convective storms identified in real time from the operational rainfall radar network. More than 1000 storm observations gathered over 15 days in 2011 and 2012 are used to evaluate the model under various synoptic conditions supporting convection. In terms of the detailed three-dimensional morphology, storms in the 1500-m grid length simulations are shown to produce horizontal structures a factor of 1.5–2 wider compared to radar observations. A set of nested model runs at grid lengths down to 100 m show that the models converge in terms of storm width, but the storm structures in the simulations with the smallest grid lengths are too narrow and too intense compared to the radar observations. The modeled storms were surrounded by a region of drizzle without ice reflectivities above 0 dBZ aloft, which was related to the dominance of ice crystals and was improved by allowing only aggregates as an ice particle habit. Simulations with graupel outperformed the standard configuration for heavy-rain profiles, but the storm structures were a factor of 2 too wide and the convective cores 2 km too deep.

Full access
D. L. A. Flack, P. A. Clark, C. E. Halliwell, N. M. Roberts, S. L. Gray, R. S. Plant, and H. W. Lean

Abstract

Convection-permitting forecasts have improved the forecasts of flooding from intense rainfall. However, probabilistic forecasts, generally based upon ensemble methods, are essential to quantify forecast uncertainty. This leads to a need to understand how different aspects of the model system affect forecast behavior. We compare the uncertainty due to initial and boundary condition (IBC) perturbations and boundary layer turbulence using a superensemble (SE) created to determine the influence of 12 IBC perturbations versus 12 stochastic boundary layer (SBL) perturbations constructed using a physically based SBL scheme. We consider two mesoscale extreme precipitation events. For each, we run a 144-member SE. The SEs are analyzed to consider the growth of differences between the simulations, and the spatial structure and scales of those differences. The SBL perturbations rapidly spin up, typically within 12 h of precipitation commencing. The SBL perturbations eventually produce spread that is not statistically different from the spread produced by the IBC perturbations, though in one case there is initially increased spread from the IBC perturbations. Spatially, the growth from IBC occurs on larger scales than that produced by the SBL perturbations (typically by an order of magnitude). However, analysis across multiple scales shows that the SBL scheme produces a random relocation of precipitation up to the scale at which the ensemble members agree with each other. This implies that statistical postprocessing can be used instead of running larger ensembles. Use of these statistical postprocessing techniques could lead to more reliable probabilistic forecasts of convective events and their associated hazards.

Open access
D. L. A. Flack, P. A. Clark, C.E. Halliwell, N. M. Roberts, S. L. Gray, R. S. Plant, and H. W. Lean

Abstract

Convection-permitting forecasts have improved the forecasts of flooding from intense rainfall. However, probabilistic forecasts, generally based upon ensemble methods, are essential to quantify forecast uncertainty. This leads to a need to understand how different aspects of the model system affect forecast behaviour. We compare the uncertainty due to initial and boundary condition (IBC) perturbations and boundary-layer turbulence using a super ensemble (SE) created to determine the influence of 12 IBC perturbations vs. 12 stochastic boundary-layer (SBL) perturbations constructed using a physically-based SBL scheme. We consider two mesoscale extreme precipitation events. For each we run a 144–member SE. The SEs are analysed to consider the growth of differences between the simulations, and the spatial structure and scales of those differences. The SBL perturbations rapidly spin-up, typically within 12 h of precipitation commencing. The SBL perturbations eventually produce spread that is not statistically different from the spread produced by the IBC perturbations, though in one case there is initially increased spread from the IBC perturbations. Spatially, the growth from IBC occurs on larger scales than that produced by the SBL perturbations (typically by an order of magnitude). However, analysis across multiple scales shows that the SBL scheme produces a random relocation of precipitation up to the scale at which the ensemble members agree with each other. This implies that statistical post-processing can be used instead of running larger ensembles. Use of these statistical post-processing techniques could lead to more reliable probabilistic forecasts of convective events and their associated hazards.

Open access