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Charles C. Bates

A procedure, based on the work of Sverdrup and Munk, is described by which swell characteristics may be forecast rapidly. Specific wave generating areas defined by the fixed parameters, wind duration and fetch, and the variable parameter, wind velocity, are established. The change in swell characteristics as the swell moves away from these generating areas is illustrated by graphs which may be re-drafted as transparent overlays at the scale of the synoptic weather chart from which swell forecasts are to be made.

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Charles C. Bates

Abstract

By working together between 1926 and 1940, two young meteorologists, Carl-Gustav A. Rossby and Francis W. Reichelderfer, played catalytic roles in the following facets of American meteorology: 1) starting a model airway weather service, 2) initiating a national academic program in meteorology, 3) establishing and guiding a postgraduate level training program for military weather officers, 4) overhauling the federal weather service, and 5) creating a reservoir of top-quality technical manpower for the postwar United States. How they accomplished this is not only interesting history of science, but also a dramatic lesson in teamwork, the use of friends, and the willingness to overlook minor differences in order to achieve national-level goals.

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Charles C. Bates
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Gilbert Jaffe, Walter Wittmann, and Charles C. Bates

At about 2000Z, 26 May 1953 the District of Columbia area experienced a hailstorm in which individual hailstones ranged up to the size of tennis balls. Determinations of the radioactive count of the water content of these hailstones and of roof gravels indicate that considerable material was brought to earth by the hailstorm from the explosion of the atomic cannon shell 29 hours earlier some 2000 airline miles away in Nevada. The air-flow pattern at upper levels proves to have been around a high-pressure ridge located between the two sites. Such a pattern permitted the arrival of such radioactive material over the District of Columbia area within the time noted.

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C. F. Brooks, H. T. Orville, D. N. Yates, I. P. Krick, B. G. Holzman, C. A. Gosline, James C. Fidler, and Charles C. Bates
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history, policy, and future of industrial meteorology

Papers presented at Session 4 of the 56th Annual Meeting of the AMS, 20 January 1976, Philadelphia, Pa.

Robert D. Elliott, Charles C. Bates, W. Boynton Beckwith, John E. Wallace, Francis K. Davis, Loren W. Crow, Edward S. Epstein, D. Ray Booker, and John C. Freeman
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