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  • Author or Editor: Cheryl Ann Blain x
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Jie Yu
,
Cheryl Ann Blain
,
Paul J. Martin
, and
Tim J. Campbell

Abstract

Presented is the approach, implementation, and evaluation of two-way nesting in a split-implicit ocean model, the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM). Emphasis is on the strategies applied to feed back fields from the fine-mesh nest (child grid) to the coarse mesh (parent grid). On an appropriate separation of dynamic and feedback interfaces, attention is especially needed for the feedback interface of surface elevation. One particular issue addressed is the inconsistency between the 3D baroclinic velocities and 2D barotropic transports in the feedback. The discrepancy is inherently associated with bathymetry, depth integration, and the need to average over spatial grid points. A simple remedy is proposed and proven to be effective and necessary in realistic coastal applications. In addition to the full two-way nesting, a simplified two-way nesting approach is provided in which only the temperature and salinity are fed back from the nest, and the velocity fields are assumed to self-adjust according to the geostrophic balance. The performance of both approaches is evaluated using the idealized benchmark, propagation of a baroclinic vortex, and an application to the Mississippi River outflow in the northeast Gulf of Mexico, including a comparison with available observations. Discussions are also made on the computational efficiency of the two-way nesting and its sensitivity to the open boundary conditions in regard to noise suppression.

Significance Statement

The two-way nesting approach reported here can be adapted to other structured-grid ocean models, in particular those using the split-implicit technique. The treatment of the feedback interface for surface elevation is especially important for suppressing the noise production and improving the feedback consistency. An effective procedure is given to amend the inconsistency in the velocity field feedback that is inherently due to bathymetry.

Restricted access
Faisal Hossain
,
Margaret Srinivasan
,
Craig Peterson
,
Alice Andral
,
Ed Beighley
,
Eric Anderson
,
Rashied Amini
,
Charon Birkett
,
David Bjerklie
,
Cheryl Ann Blain
,
Selma Cherchali
,
Cédric H. David
,
Bradley Doorn
,
Jorge Escurra
,
Lee-Lueng Fu
,
Chris Frans
,
John Fulton
,
Subhrendu Gangopadhay
,
Subimal Ghosh
,
Colin Gleason
,
Marielle Gosset
,
Jessica Hausman
,
Gregg Jacobs
,
John Jones
,
Yasir Kaheil
,
Benoit Laignel
,
Patrick Le Moigne
,
Li Li
,
Fabien Lefèvre
,
Robert Mason
,
Amita Mehta
,
Abhijit Mukherjee
,
Anthony Nguy-Robertson
,
Sophie Ricci
,
Adrien Paris
,
Tamlin Pavelsky
,
Nicolas Picot
,
Guy Schumann
,
Sudhir Shrestha
,
Pierre-Yves Le Traon
, and
Eric Trehubenko
Open access
Suzanne Van Cooten
,
Kevin E. Kelleher
,
Kenneth Howard
,
Jian Zhang
,
Jonathan J. Gourley
,
John S. Kain
,
Kodi Nemunaitis-Monroe
,
Zac Flamig
,
Heather Moser
,
Ami Arthur
,
Carrie Langston
,
Randall Kolar
,
Yang Hong
,
Kendra Dresback
,
Evan Tromble
,
Humberto Vergara
,
Richard A Luettich Jr.
,
Brian Blanton
,
Howard Lander
,
Ken Galluppi
,
Jessica Proud Losego
,
Cheryl Ann Blain
,
Jack Thigpen
,
Katie Mosher
,
Darin Figurskey
,
Michael Moneypenny
,
Jonathan Blaes
,
Jeff Orrock
,
Rich Bandy
,
Carin Goodall
,
John G. W. Kelley
,
Jason Greenlaw
,
Micah Wengren
,
Dave Eslinger
,
Jeff Payne
,
Geno Olmi
,
John Feldt
,
John Schmidt
,
Todd Hamill
,
Robert Bacon
,
Robert Stickney
, and
Lundie Spence

The objective of the Coastal and Inland Flooding Observation and Warning (CI-FLOW) project is to prototype new hydrometeorologic techniques to address a critical NOAA service gap: routine total water level predictions for tidally influenced watersheds. Since February 2000, the project has focused on developing a coupled modeling system to accurately account for water at all locations in a coastal watershed by exchanging data between atmospheric, hydrologic, and hydrodynamic models. These simulations account for the quantity of water associated with waves, tides, storm surge, rivers, and rainfall, including interactions at the tidal/surge interface.

Within this project, CI-FLOW addresses the following goals: i) apply advanced weather and oceanographic monitoring and prediction techniques to the coastal environment; ii) prototype an automated hydrometeorologic data collection and prediction system; iii) facilitate interdisciplinary and multiorganizational collaborations; and iv) enhance techniques and technologies that improve actionable hydrologic/hydrodynamic information to reduce the impacts of coastal flooding. Results are presented for Hurricane Isabel (2003), Hurricane Earl (2010), and Tropical Storm Nicole (2010) for the Tar–Pamlico and Neuse River basins of North Carolina. This area was chosen, in part, because of the tremendous damage inflicted by Hurricanes Dennis and Floyd (1999). The vision is to transition CI-FLOW research findings and technologies to other U.S. coastal watersheds.

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