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  • Author or Editor: D. V. Ahire x
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A. K. Kamra and D. V. Ahire

Abstract

A simple technique is described by which multiple millimeter-size water drops can be simultaneously suspended in an air stream above the test section of a 12 × 12 cm cross section of a vertical wind tunnel. Horizontal profiles of the vertical air velocity at the level of suspension of the drops are measured. Stability of the drops is discussed and possible uses of the new technique are pointed out.

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A. K. Kamra and D. V. Ahire

Abstract

When a small isolated ice piece of conical shape is suspended with its apex facing down between two horizontal parallel electrodes and an electric field of 1 to 1.6 kV cm−1 is applied between them with the lower electrode at negative potential, a mist of fine monodisperse particles is observed for a fraction of a second from the apex of the ice piece. Charges on different ice pieces have been measured to be in the range of 10−9–10−8 C after the occurrence of smoke. The phenomenon has been simulated for some conditions that exist in melting layers of thunderstorms and it is proposed that ice graupel or hailstones falling in melting layers of electrified thunderstorms may produce the type of mist observed in our experiments. It is further suggested that the positively charged mist particles generated in this phenomenon may influence the cloud microphysics and might be responsible for the lower positive charge pockets sometimes reported in the bases of well-developed thunderstorms.

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A. K. Kamra and D. V. Ahire

Abstract

Electrical atomization of water dripping from plant leaves has been studied. It is observed that when a high positive d.c. voltage of 8−10 kV is applied to a plant then the water dripping from its leaves tips comes off the tips as a smoke of very fine monodisperse particles. Voltages required to produce the smoke and the currents associated with it have been measured. Possible significance of this phenomenon in transferring charge from foliage to the atmosphere below thunderstorms, and its probable role in introducing charged aerosols and organic and living materials into the atmosphere are discussed.

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