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David J. Karoly

Abstract

Eliassen-Palm cross sections and residual meridional circulations are presented for the Northern and Southern Hemispheres for summer and winter based on the data of Newell et al. (1972, 1974). The cross sections are similar to those presented by Edmon et al. (1980) for the Northern Hemisphere except that, in the Southern Hemisphere, there is much less variation between summer and winter than in the Northern Hemisphere.

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David J. Karoly

Abstract

Composite seasonal mean and anomaly fields prepared from operational numerical analyses have been used to describe the Southern Hemisphere (SH) circulation features associated with El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events. The period of analyses available (1972–83) has limited the composites to include only three ENSO events. The reliability and stability of the composites has been tested using multiple permutation methods and by comparison with the results obtained using a longer period (1950–79) of SH rawinsonde station data.

In the SH winter, a weak equivalent-barotropic wavetrain pattern of anomalies extends over Australia and the South Pacific Ocean to South America. This wavetrain pattern is quite variable in amplitude and location between ENSO events, although it is more stable over the subtropical Pacific. In the SH summer, the circulation anomalies are more zonally symmetric, with increased height at low and high latitudes and decreased height in middle latitudes. The circulation anomalies in the SH summer are more stable than in winter, with similar patterns of anomalies in the subtropics and middle latitudes in all events.

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David J. Karoly

Abstract

The vacillatory behavior of the general circulation model described by Hunt (1978a,b) is analyzed using transformed Eulerian-mean diagnostics. This model was shown by Hunt to have large time variations in the troposphere and stratosphere with a period of ∼20 days. These diagnostics are used to show the coupling between the troposphere and the stratosphere and the forcing of mean state changes during the vacillation cycle.

The time variations of the wave-induced form on the mean flow and the Coriolis torque are in approximate balance throughout the vacillation cycle. Thus mean flow changes are small and the effect of the mean state on wave propagation is approximately constant. The vacillation cycle in the model is apparently due to variations in baroclinic wave activity in the troposphere and not to wave, mean flow interaction in the upper troposphere and stratosphere.

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David J. Karoly and Karl Braganza

Abstract

Variations of Australian-average mean temperature and diurnal temperature range over the twentieth century are investigated. The observed interannual variability of both is simulated reasonably well by a number of climate models, but they do not simulate the observed relationship between the two. Comparison of the observed warming and reduction in diurnal temperature range with climate model simulations shows that Australian temperature changes over the twentieth century were very unlikely to be due to natural climate variations alone. It is likely that there has been a significant contribution to the observed warming during the second half of the century from increasing atmospheric greenhouse gases and sulfate aerosols.

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David J. Karoly and Qigang Wu

Abstract

Trends in surface temperature over the last 100, 50, and 30 yr at individual grid boxes in a 5° latitude–longitude grid are compared with model estimates of the natural internal variability of these trends and with the model response to increasing greenhouse gases and sulfate aerosols. Three different climate models are used to provide estimates of the internal variability of trends, one of which appears to overestimate the observed variability of surface temperature at interannual and 5-yr time scales. Significant warming trends are found at a large fraction of the individual grid boxes over the globe, a much larger fraction than can be explained by internal climate variations. The observed warming trends over the last 50 and 30 yr are consistent with the modeled response to increasing greenhouse gases and sulfate aerosols in most of the models. However, in some regions, the observed century-scale trends are significantly larger than the modeled response to increasing greenhouse gases and sulfate aerosols in the atmosphere. Warming trends consistent with the response to anthropogenic forcing are detected at scales on the order of 500 km in many regions of the globe.

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Melissa S. Bukovsky and David J. Karoly

Abstract

In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is employed as a nested regional climate model to dynamically downscale output from the National Center for Atmospheric Research’s (NCAR’s) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) version 3 and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)–NCAR global reanalysis (NNRP). The latter is used for verification of late-twentieth-century climate simulations from the WRF.

This analysis finds that the WRF is able to produce precipitation that is more realistic than that from its driving systems (the CCSM and NNRP). It also diagnoses potential issues with and differences between all of the simulations completed. Specifically, the magnitude of heavy 6-h average precipitation events, the frequency distribution, and the diurnal cycle of precipitation over the central United States are greatly improved. Projections from the WRF for late-twenty-first-century precipitation show decreases in average May–August (MJJA) precipitation, but increases in the intensity of both heavy precipitation events and rain in general when it does fall. A decrease in the number of 6-h periods with rainfall accounts for the overall decrease in average precipitation. The WRF also shows an increase in the frequency of very heavy to extreme 6-h average events, but a decrease in the frequency of all events lighter than those over the central United States. Overall, projections from this study suggest an increase in the frequency of both floods and droughts during the warm season in the central United States.

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David J. Karoly and Dayton G. Vincent

Abstract

No Abstract available.

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Diandong Ren, Lance M. Leslie, and David Karoly

Abstract

In this study, landslide potential is investigated, using a new constitutive relationship for granular flow in a numerical model. Unique to this study is an original relationship between soil moisture and the inertial number for soil particles. This numerical model can be applied to arbitrary soil slab profile configurations and to the analysis of natural disasters, such as mudslides, glacier creeping, avalanches, landslips, and other pyroclastic flows. Here the focus is on mudslides.

The authors examine the effects of bed slope and soil slab thickness, soil layered profile configuration, soil moisture content, basal sliding, and the growth of vegetation, and show that increased soil moisture enhances instability primarily by decreasing soil strength, together with increasing loading. Moreover, clay soils generally require a smaller relative saturation than sandy soils for sliding to commence. For a stable configuration, such as a small slope and/or dry soil, the basal sliding is absorbed if the perturbation magnitude is small. However, large perturbations can trigger significant-scale mudslides by liquefying the soil slab.

The role of vegetation depends on the wet soil thickness and the spacing between vegetation roots. The thinner the saturated soil layer, the slower the flow, giving the vegetation additional time to extract soil moisture and slow down the flow. By analyzing the effect of the root system on the stress distribution, it is shown that closer tree spacing increases the drag effects on the velocity field, provided that the root system is deeper than the shearing zone.

Finally, the authors investigated a two-layer soil profile, namely, sand above clay. A significant stress jump occurs at the interface of the two media.

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Melissa S. Bukovsky and David J. Karoly

Abstract

Several aspects of the precipitation climatology from the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) are analyzed and compared with two other reanalyses and one set of gridded observations over a domain encompassing the United States. The spatial distribution, diurnal cycle, and annual cycle of precipitation are explored to establish the reliability of the reanalyses and to judge their usefulness. While the NARR provides a much improved representation of precipitation over that of the other reanalyses examined, some inaccuracies are found and have been highlighted as a warning to potential users of the data.

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Mitchell T. Black and David J. Karoly
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