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  • Author or Editor: Don R. Collins x
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Sarah A. Tessendorf
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Roelof T. Bruintjes
,
Courtney Weeks
,
James W. Wilson
,
Charles A. Knight
,
Rita D. Roberts
,
Justin R. Peter
,
Scott Collis
,
Peter R. Buseck
,
Evelyn Freney
,
Michael Dixon
,
Matthew Pocernich
,
Kyoko Ikeda
,
Duncan Axisa
,
Eric Nelson
,
Peter T. May
,
Harald Richter
,
Stuart Piketh
,
Roelof P. Burger
,
Louise Wilson
,
Steven T. Siems
,
Michael Manton
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Roger C. Stone
,
Acacia Pepler
,
Don R. Collins
,
V. N. Bringi
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M. Thurai
,
Lynne Turner
, and
David McRae

As a response to extreme water shortages in southeast Queensland, Australia, brought about by reduced rainfall and increasing population, the Queensland government decided to explore the potential for cloud seeding to enhance rainfall. The Queensland Cloud Seeding Research Program (QCSRP) was conducted in the southeast Queensland region near Brisbane during the 2008/09 wet seasons. In addition to conducting an initial exploratory, randomized (statistical) cloud seeding study, multiparameter radar measurements and in situ aircraft microphysical data were collected. This comprehensive set of observational platforms was designed to improve the physical understanding of the effects of both ambient aerosols and seeding material on precipitation formation in southeast Queensland clouds. This focus on gaining physical understanding, along with the unique combination of modern observational platforms utilized in the program, set it apart from previous cloud seeding research programs. The overarching goals of the QCSRP were to 1) determine the characteristics of local cloud systems (i.e., weather and climate), 2) document the properties of atmospheric aerosol and their microphysical effects on precipitation formation, and 3) assess the impact of cloud seeding on cloud microphysical and dynamical processes to enhance rainfall. During the course of the program, it became clear that there is great variability in the natural cloud systems in the southeast Queensland region, and understanding that variability would be necessary before any conclusions could be made regarding the impact of cloud seeding. This article presents research highlights and progress toward achieving the goals of the program, along with the challenges associated with conducting cloud seeding research experiments

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Andrew M. Vogelmann
,
Greg M. McFarquhar
,
John A. Ogren
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David D. Turner
,
Jennifer M. Comstock
,
Graham Feingold
,
Charles N. Long
,
Haflidi H. Jonsson
,
Anthony Bucholtz
,
Don R. Collins
,
Glenn S. Diskin
,
Hermann Gerber
,
R. Paul Lawson
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Roy K. Woods
,
Elisabeth Andrews
,
Hee-Jung Yang
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J. Christine Chiu
,
Daniel Hartsock
,
John M. Hubbe
,
Chaomei Lo
,
Alexander Marshak
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Justin W. Monroe
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Sally A. McFarlane
,
Beat Schmid
,
Jason M. Tomlinson
, and
Tami Toto

A first-of-a-kind, extended-term cloud aircraft campaign was conducted to obtain an in situ statistical characterization of continental boundary layer clouds needed to investigate cloud processes and refine retrieval algorithms. Coordinated by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility (AAF), the Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign operated over the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site from 22 January to 30 June 2009, collecting 260 h of data during 59 research flights. A comprehensive payload aboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft measured cloud microphysics, solar and thermal radiation, physical aerosol properties, and atmospheric state parameters. Proximity to the SGP's extensive complement of surface measurements provides ancillary data that support modeling studies and facilitates evaluation of a variety of surface retrieval algorithms. The five-month duration enabled sampling a range of conditions associated with the seasonal transition from winter to summer. Although about twothirds of the flights during which clouds were sampled occurred in May and June, boundary layer cloud fields were sampled under a variety of environmental and aerosol conditions, with about 77% of the cloud flights occurring in cumulus and stratocumulus. Preliminary analyses illustrate use of these data to analyze aerosol– cloud relationships, characterize the horizontal variability of cloud radiative impacts, and evaluate surface-based retrievals. We discuss how an extended-term campaign requires a simplified operating paradigm that is different from that used for typical, short-term, intensive aircraft field programs.

Full access
Gregory C. Johnson
,
Rick Lumpkin
,
Simone R. Alin
,
Dillon J. Amaya
,
Molly O. Baringer
,
Tim Boyer
,
Peter Brandt
,
Brendan R. Carter
,
Ivona Cetinić
,
Don P. Chambers
,
Lijing Cheng
,
Andrew U. Collins
,
Cathy Cosca
,
Ricardo Domingues
,
Shenfu Dong
,
Richard A. Feely
,
Eleanor Frajka-Williams
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Bryan A. Franz
,
John Gilson
,
Gustavo Goni
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Benjamin D. Hamlington
,
Josefine Herrford
,
Zeng-Zhen Hu
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Boyin Huang
,
Masayoshi Ishii
,
Svetlana Jevrejeva
,
John J. Kennedy
,
Marion Kersalé
,
Rachel E. Killick
,
Peter Landschützer
,
Matthias Lankhorst
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Eric Leuliette
,
Ricardo Locarnini
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John M. Lyman
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John J. Marra
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Christopher S. Meinen
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Mark A. Merrifield
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Gary T. Mitchum
,
Ben I. Moat
,
R. Steven Nerem
,
Renellys C. Perez
,
Sarah G. Purkey
,
James Reagan
,
Alejandra Sanchez-Franks
,
Hillary A. Scannell
,
Claudia Schmid
,
Joel P. Scott
,
David A. Siegel
,
David A. Smeed
,
Paul W. Stackhouse
,
William Sweet
,
Philip R. Thompson
,
Joaquin A. Triñanes
,
Denis L. Volkov
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Rik Wanninkhof
,
Robert A. Weller
,
Caihong Wen
,
Toby K. Westberry
,
Matthew J. Widlansky
,
Anne C. Wilber
,
Lisan Yu
, and
Huai-Min Zhang
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