Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Edith I. Reed x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Jearl D. Walker and Edith I. Reed

Abstract

The behavior of the sodium and hydroxyl nighttime emissions during a stratospheric warming has been studied principally by use of data from the airglow photometers on the OGO 4 satellite. During the late stages of a major warming, both emissions increased appreciably, with the sodium emission returning to normal values prior to the decrease in the hydroxyl emission. The emission behaviors are attributed to temperature and density variations from 70 to 94 km, and a one-dimensional hydrostatic model for that altitude range is used to calculate the effects on the emissions and on the mesospheric ozone densities. These results support the existence of a warming in the upper part of the mesosphere that is correlated with a major stratospheric warming.

Full access
Guenter Warnecke, Edith I. Reed, Walter B. Fowler, Earl R. Kreins, Lewis J. Allison, and Jaques E. Blamont

Abstract

The presence or absence of clouds, their characteristics, and variations of surface albedo have been correlated with observations made at several different wavelengths in the visible spectrum. These were made at high and low nighttime light levels by an airglow photometer aboard the OGO-4 satellite during August 1967 through January 1968. The wavelength regions studied were approximately 50 Å bands centered at 3914, 5577, 5893, 6225 and 6300 Å, in the energy range of 10−7 to 10−3 erg cm−2 sec−1−1 ster−1 with a field of view of ˜10 degrees. It was found that at the longer wavelengths (6225 and 6300 Å) the observations were strongly influenced by the variations of surface albedo. At the shorter wavelengths, the surface albedo variations were partly masked by the light returned through Rayleigh and Mie scattering. Preliminary analysis is made of surface and clouds by study of reflective radiance under moonlight and other nocturnal illuminations. Possibilities of further analysis are examined including methods of deducing cloud height information.

Full access