Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items for

  • Author or Editor: Edwin X. Berry x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Edwin X. Berry

Abstract

Time-lapse photographs taken of a visual tracer laid in horizontal lines at several levels, one above the other, show convective motion of the air in a vertical plane. Through minor improvements in technique a three-dimensional picture of the air motion could be achieved.

Full access
Edwin X. Berry

Abstract

A mathematical framework is described which allows the logical joining of the processes of condensation, collection and advection, and also freezing and electrical effects in a cloud model.

Full access
Edwin X Berry

Abstract

Full access
Edwin X. Berry and Maarten R. Pranger

Abstract

The experimental data of Gunn and Kinzer, Beard and Pruppacher, and Davies are used to curve-fit a polynomial for Re in terms of C dRe2. The resulting equations predict very accurately all known experimental data for drop fall velocities at sea level and at higher altitudes. Iteration of the equations is not necessary.

Full access
Klaus W. Nielsen and Edwin X. Berry

Abstract

Common motor oil is injected into the exhaust manifold of an aircraft where it is vaporized, and then mixes into the cold outside air to condense into a dense oil fog. This air marking technique has been used in atmospheric research activities to visually track or maintain contact between research aircraft in flight, and to track seeded plumes and air parcels.

Full access
John D. Marwitz and Edwin X. Berry

Abstract

A severe hailstorm having many of the characteristics of Browning's right-moving severe local storms occurred in Alberta on 28 July 1969. This storm was systematically scanned by the Alberta Hail Studies high-resolution 10-cm radar and by the 3-cm radar in the Desert Research Institute's B-26 research aircraft. The former obtained reflectivity factor data throughout the volume of the storm while the latter obtained ground-reference PPI radar contours at flight levels varying from cloud base (7000 ft MSL) to 16,000 ft, and updraft measurements on the southern side of the storm in the Weak Echo Region (WER). Updrafts were smooth and reached a speed of 3500 ft min−1 (18 m sec−1). The width of the WER narrowed from ∼4 mi near cloud base to 2 mi at 16,000 ft. The radar echo was found to tilt approximately 40° from the vertical toward the right of the mean environmental winds. The echo intensity reached 30 dBZ at 25,000 ft directly above the WER.

Full access
Edwin X. Berry and Richard L. Reinhardt

Abstract

A new, highly accurate, yet fast method for the numerical solution of the stochastic collection equation is described. Basic size distribution parameters are defined that lay a basis for a parameterized description of stochastic collection. Application is made to double initial distributions. A newly defined mode, here designated “large hydrometeor self-collection”, is found to occupy an important position along with auto-conversion, accretion and breakup in the generalized description of drop growth by collection.

Full access
Edwin X. Berry and Richard L. Reinhardt

Abstract

Accretion is shown to have a narrowing effect on the drop size distribution while the newly defined processes “large hydrometeor self-collection, ” is shown to he responsible for the rapid growth of large hydrometeors and observed broadening of drop distribution. Both processes are given parameterizations in terms of rate equations and coefficients.

Full access

Project METROMEX

a review of results

Edwin X Berry and Robert W. Beadle
Full access
Edwin X. Berry and Richard L. Reinhardt

Abstract

The initial spreading of a cloud droplet distribution, its time of formation and placement of the second maximum, and the value of the minimum between the two maxima are systematically related to the mean mass and standard deviation of the initial distribution.

Full access