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H. W. Baynton

For a six week period in 1952, a network of twenty high volume air samplers was used to measure the concentration of particulate pollution in Detroit and Windsor. Using a graphical multiple regression technique, regression curves are obtained which relate particulate pollution directly with temperature anomaly, and 24 hour temperature change, and inversely with wind speed, and duration of precipitation.

The relationships were modified for application to independent data covering each of the four seasons. The results appeared useful, although rigorous claims about significance cannot be made where graphical methods are employed.

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H. W. Baynton

A rocketsonde for airborne launch as part of the AN/AMQ-15 Weather Reconnaissance system is described. Details are given of the rocketsonde test program carried out at White Sands Proving Ground in 1959. The performance of various components of the rocketsonde is described in general terms.

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H. W. Baynton

Rocketsondes were used to obtain temperature profiles up to heights of 128,000 ft over White Sands Proving Ground. A thermistor mounted in a duct internal to the rocketsonde yielded a profile warmer than a concurrent radiosonde but in good agreement with an acoustic profile proposed by Reed. When an external duct was used, the rocketsonde profile conformed to the radiosonde and ICAO standards up to 110,000 ft, but above this height the inversion intensified abruptly and the profile was rapidly approaching the acoustic profile at the top of the flight. It is suggested that the reconciliation between acoustic profiles and the ICAO standard may be found in a relatively thin layer in which the ozonospheric inversion intensifies.

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H. W. Baynton
,
R. J. Serafin
,
C. L. Frush
,
G. R. Gray
,
P. V. Hobbs
,
R. A. Houze Jr
, and
J. D. Locatelli

Abstract

Color displays of the velocities of precipitation particles detected with a C-band Doppler radar in wide-spread cyclonic storms provide a variety of real-time information on the atmospheric wind field.Vertical profiles of wind speed and direction indicated by the real-time color displays agree well withrawinsonde measurements. Veering winds (or warm advection) produce a striking S-shaped pattern onthe color display and backing winds (or cold advection) produce a backward S. A maximum in the verticalprofile of wind speed is indicated by a pair of concentric colored rings, one upwind and one downwind ofthe radar. Vertically sloping velocity maxima are indicated by asymmetries in the color displays, as areconfluent and difluent winds. Divergence and convergence computed from the real-time color displays areof reasonable magnitude.

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