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Harold L. Stolov

Abstract

After evaluation of the surface wind system associated with the stationary wave, the total tidal wind field on the surface is developed from the total semidiurnal pressure oscillation. Two major criticisms of the linear theory are studied and are shown to be unfounded. It is shown that the effect of the earth's magnetic field can certainly be neglected up to the E region. It is shown that even at 125 kilometers the viscous terms are some ten million times smaller than the retained linear terms. The 100-km tidal wind field is developed from the surface tidal wind field and some deductions from the linear theory of Taylor and Pekeris. The ionospheric wind observations near 100 km reported in the literature are discussed, and are shown to be in general agreement with the computed tidal winds.

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Harold L. Stolov and Jerome Spar

Abstract

Surface atmospheric pressures are studied for periods before and after chromospheric flares by the superposed epoch method for 31 meteorological stations in North America. The individual analyses show no statistically significant pressure departures following the flares. No evidence is found for claims that continental and coastal stations exhibit different responses to the flares. No evidence is found for claims that atmospheric pressure responses to flares are amplified with increasing latitude. The composite curve for North American stations shows no statistically significant departures and does not verify the composite curve of previous investigators. Chromospheric flares with polar cap absorption (PCA) events and chromospheric flares without PCA events are indistinguishable in the response of surface atmospheric pressure in the polar cap, failing to support the claims of previous investigators. All the departures observed in this study of North American data can be explained by the ordinary transient meteorological variations of the pressure field.

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Harold L. Stolov and Ralph Shapiro

Abstract

No abstract available.

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Ralph Shapiro and Harold L. Stolov

Abstract

Power and cross-power spectra involving the daily average station pressure at arctic and antarctic stations along with various measures of solar variability, such as f min, riometer data, and Kp, failed to reveal any associations between solar particle emission and the surface pressure in polar legions. However, a small but apparently real, coherent variation in surface pressure exists between the two polar regions. This oscillation with period somewhat greater than 60 days is almost exactly 180° out of phase between the two polar regions, indicating a more or less direct exchange of mass between the arctic and antarctic.

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Ralph Shapiro and Harold L. Stolov

Abstract

An attempt is made to find a relationship between solar variability and weather using the skill scores of an objective weather forecasting procedure as the basis of analysis. The hypothesis being tested rests on the nature of a numerical weather prediction model as an initial value problem and on the fact that the model does not include, either explicitly or implicitly, the effects of solar variability which occur between the time of the initial input data and the time of forecast verification. Therefore, solar disturbance, if it affects the weather, is expected to result in forecasts which are less skillful than average and the lack of solar disturbance, in more skillful forecasts.

Geomagnetically disturbed and quiet days are used as measures of solar disturbance and solar quiet, respectively. In addition, the interplanetary magnetic sector structure is also used as a measure of organized solar activity. Although some of the results may be interpreted as indicating a real solar effect, that are internal inconsistencies which lead perforce to the conclusion that the case for a sun-weather effect is not proven.

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