Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 36 items for

  • Author or Editor: Harry R. Glahn x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Harry R. Glahn

Abstract

No abstract available.

Full access
HARRY R. GLAHN

Abstract

The regression screening and principal component techniques for developing forecast aids are investigated for their applicability to the objective forecasting of rainfall probabilities. The forecasting of summer rainfall in the Mississippi Delta is the particular problem studied. Subjective forecasts made for the area as well as objective forecasts are verified in terms of reductions of variance and saving over climatology. It is found that many of the forecast equations developed by regression screening and principal component techniques are not stable on test data. The results indicate that subjective screening of predictors is desirable before the regression screening is accomplished. It is found that useful aids can be developed with these linear techniques; at the same time the desirability of an approach that better integrates the physical processes of the atmosphere is indicated.

Full access
Harry R. Glahn

Abstract

No abstract available.

Full access
Harry R. Glahn

Abstract

No abstract available.

Full access
Harry R. Glahn

Abstract

No abstract available.

Full access
Harry R. Glahn

Abstract

Full access
Harry R. Glahn

Abstract

No abstract available.

Full access
Harry R. Glahn

Abstract

There is a popular misconception that the secant form of the Lambert conformal map projection is “better” than the tangent form. It is shown here that the two forms are equivalent; they are different only in the sense that the scale of the map quoted is usually true at the two secant latitudes for the secant projections and at the single tangent latitude for the tangent projection.

Full access
Harry R. Glahn

Examples of worded weather forecasts prepared entirely by computer are presented. Forecasts of the individual elements are produced objectively with input from the Primitive Equation and Subsynoptic Advection models used operationally at the ESSA Weather Bureau's National Meteorological Center. Possibilities for the use of automated worded forecasts are discussed.

Full access
Harry R. Glahn

A computer program is available that produces public weather forecasts in worded form from digital forecasts of weather elements. This program was designed to be implemented concurrently with the AFOS (Automation of Field Operations and Services) system. One version of the program operates on NOAA's large computer system and will send forecasts over the National Distribution Circuit; another version can be run on the local AFOS minicomputers.

This paper describes input to the program, the options available for its use, the decision processes whereby the forecast is constructed, the output of the program, and plans for its use. In addition, examples are shown of worded forecasts covering a variety of weather situations.

Full access