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Irving I. Schell
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Irving I. Schell

Three pairs of historical series of mean monthly sea-surface temperatures in the North Atlantic were analyzed, one pair from the tropical area, 15N to 20N, 60W to 65W, dominated by the North Equatorial Current; the second from the semitropical area, 30N to 35N, 55W to 60W, by the Gulf Stream; and the third pair from the polar area, 45N to 50N, 45W to 50W, off Newfoundland by the Labrador Current.

The results obtained show that, by successively eliminating those values based upon few observations per month, the standard deviation, σ, tends to become relatively constant and may then serve as a criterion of the representativeness of sea surface temperature data.

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Irving I. Schell
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Irving I. Schell
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Irving I. Schell
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Irving I. Schell
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Irving I. Schell

Abstract

It is shown that the mean sea-ice limit in the Greenland and Barents Seas during the period April–August is a substantial measure of both the sea-surface temperature near the Faroes and the east coast of Iceland, and the air temperature at Iceland, during the subsequent period September–February.

Furthermore, it is shown that decadal variations of Arctic ice are a measure of decadal trends of ocean phenomena and weather in the region of the northern North Atlantic Ocean.

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Irving I. Schell

Abstract

Detailed evidence is presented of the relationship of the winter and preceding fall pressure in the Philippines and adjacent areas with the winter precipitation of the North Pacific and North America, affirming the principle of dynamic persistence. An examination of several dynamic-persistence relationships during the l7-year period from 1939-1940 to 1955-1956 shows their foreshadowing performance to be appreciably better than could be obtained from probability and simple persistence considerations.

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Heavy Snowstorms at Blue Hill (Boston), Mass. (Concluded from May Bulletin, p. 167)

III. Precipitation Index at Washington, D. C., and Buffalo, N. Y., Associated With Heavy Winter Snowstorms at Blue Hill

Irving I. Schell

The local precipitation indexes, w/L (namely, the ratio of the specific humidity to the lift required to initiate condensation), at Washington, D. C., and Buffalo, N. Y., from which directions the storms reaching Blue Hill usually arrive, are moderate to large shortly before and during (all but near the end of) a heavy snowstorm at Blue Hill, and give some indication of the amount of precipitation to be expected.

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Forecasting Heavy Snowstorms at Blue Hill (Boston), Mass.

I. Tracks of the Cyclones Producing Heavy Snows in the Winters of 1938/9 to 1946/7

Charles F. Brooks and Irving I. Schell

The 16 snowstorms yielding 9 inches or more of snowfall at Blue Hill in the months November to March were all associated with cyclones forming south of Lat. 40° and passing 70 to 265 miles south or southeast of Blue Hill. Half of them were young secondaries.

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