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  • Author or Editor: J. M. Vergin x
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J. M. Vergin, D. R. Johnson, and R. Atlas

Abstract

The results of a quasi-Lagrangian diagnostic study of two 72 h Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences (GLAS) model cyclone predictions from 0000 GMT 19 February 1976 are presented and compared with observed results. One model forecast (SAT) was generated from initial conditions which included satellite sounding data, and the other model forecast (NOSAT) was generated from initial conditions that excluded satellite sounding data. Examination of the mass and angular momentum budget statistics for the SAT and NOSAT forecasts reveals substantial differences. The improvement in the SAT forecast is established from the more realistic SAT budget statistics, and results from the modifications of initial atmospheric structure due to satellite information.

The assimilation of satellite data caused modifications of the horizontal mass and eddy angular momentum transports at the zero hour. The assimilation of satellite data resulted in colder temperatures and weaker stabilities in the lower layers of the northwest quadrant of the budget volume, and thus an improved structure of the cold polar air mass over a relatively warm ocean surface. In the southwest quadrant of the budget volume, the SAT assimilation produced an increase in the stability of the middle and lower layers and an increase in temperatures throughout much of the troposphere. These modifications in the temperature structure were the primary reasons for the improved mass and eddy angular momentum transports which contributed to the better SAT forecast for the cyclone event.

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