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JOHN H. LEWIS

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JOHN H. LEWIS

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JOHN H. LEWIS

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John M. Lewis and Thomas H. Grayson

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The sea level pressure and surface wind fields operationally produced at Fleet Numerical Weather Central are adjusted by using numerical variational analysis. The analysis region is a global band extending from 40S to 6ON and the successive corrections method is used to generate the initial or input fields. These fields are then adjusted within the framework of the variational method by requiring that they satisfy certain governing dynamical equations.

A detailed study of this method is made in the Atlantic Ocean region on 4 January 1971. There is convincing evidence that small-scale wind information is incorporated into the pressure field and that the adjusted wind field has been modified to account for ageostrophic motion.

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Gregory P. Gerbi, Emmanuel Boss, P. Jeremy Werdell, Christopher W. Proctor, Nils Haëntjens, Marlon R. Lewis, Keith Brown, Diego Sorrentino, J. Ronald V. Zaneveld, Andrew H. Barnard, John Koegler, Hugh Fargher, Matthew DeDonato, and William Wallace

Abstract

The use of autonomous profiling floats for observational estimates of radiometric quantities in the ocean is explored, and the use of this platform for validation of satellite-based estimates of remote sensing reflectance in the ocean is examined. This effort includes comparing quantities estimated from float and satellite data at nominal wavelengths of 412, 443, 488, and 555 nm, and examining sources and magnitudes of uncertainty in the float estimates. This study had 65 occurrences of coincident high-quality observations from floats and MODIS Aqua and 15 occurrences of coincident high-quality observations floats and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS). The float estimates of remote sensing reflectance are similar to the satellite estimates, with disagreement of a few percent in most wavelengths. The variability of the float–satellite comparisons is similar to the variability of in situ–satellite comparisons using a validation dataset from the Marine Optical Buoy (MOBY). This, combined with the agreement of float-based and satellite-based quantities, suggests that floats are likely a good platform for validation of satellite-based estimates of remote sensing reflectance.

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