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  • Author or Editor: Jack W. Blelloch x
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Samson Brand and Jack W. Blelloch

Tropical cyclone forecast improvements in the western North Pacific are examined in terms of Department of Defense decision making (evacuation, sortie, preparedness, etc.). The improved decisions are then related directly to Department of Defense potential cost saving.

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Samson Brand and Jack W. Blelloch

Abstract

Twenty-two typhoons (1960–72) are examined to determine the effect of Taiwan on the intensity and movement of tropical cyclones crossing the island. The results show an average intensity (maximum surface wind) decrease of over 40% and a distinct northward deflection as the storms approach the island with a southward deflection after passage. Forecast rules for typhoons approaching or crossing Taiwan are presented.

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Samson Brand and Jack W. Blelloch

Abstract

Thirty typhoons (1960–70) are examined to determine the effect of the Philippines an the intensity, speed of movement, and size characteristics of tropical cyclones crossing the Philippines. The results show an average intensity (maximum surface wind) decrease of 33%, a northward perturbation as the storms pass through the Islands, and a decrease of circulation size for weak typhoons. The study also showed an increase in speed of movement as storms approach the Philippines.

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Samson Brand, Jack W. Blelloch, and Donald C. Schertz

Abstract

The combined sea-height data for the year 1971 for the western North Pacific Ocean are examined to determine the sea-state characteristics around tropical storms and typhoons. The results show that the areal extent about the storms of the combined sea height in the 9–15 ft range is primarily a function of storm duration, intensity (maximum sustained wind) and size. Equations derived by linear regression techniques are presented for describing the state of the sea about tropical cyclones.

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Samson Brand, James M. Long, Jack W. Blelloch, and Glenn D. Hamilton

Abstract

A tropical cyclone analog program for the North Indian Ocean area is described. The program is a statistical computer technique to provide forecasts for Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea tropical cyclones from 12 to 72 h.

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