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James G. Edinger

Abstract

Aerometerograph soundings made at seven locations over the Los Angeles coastal plain and adjacent valleys during the summer of 1957 are analyzed to provide the hourly daytime variations in the depth of the marine layer as a function of geographical location. The factors influencing the depth of the marine layer are evaluated and combined to form a model for the changes in depth of the marine layer as a function of time of day and distance from the coast.

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James G. Edinger

Abstract

An Instrumented light plane was flow through three wave clouds formed at the upper boundary of the marine layer just upwind of a headland, Pt. Sal, along the California coast. Temperatures and vertical velocities were recorded continuously during two traverses through the waves. The mean height of the interface, wavelength, potential temperature of the marine layer, potential temperature of the overlying warmer layer, the wind speed and the phase speed of the waves were determined. These values are shown to be consistent with theory for gravity waves at an interface separating two autobarotropic layers.

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James G. Edinger

Abstract

The modification and eventual destruction of the marine layer by heating from below is documented by measuring the temperature and humidity fields in a vertical section from the coast of Southern California inland along the trajectory of the air. An instrumented light aircraft is used as the meteorological probe. The base of the temperature inversion near the top of the marine layer is seen to propagate downward into the marine layer as a result of the accumulation of convective debris at the top of the layer. At the inland extremity of the vertical section the marine air is observed to have warmed to the point where convective elements originating at the ground are able to escape the layer and rise into the warm dry air above. Implications of these results on the accumulation and distribution of air pollution are discussed.

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James G. Edinger

The process by which large airborne particles move farther apart with time in our atmosphere is investigated by means of simple examples and arguments.

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James G. Edinger and Roger A. Helvey

The vertical structure of a zone of converging winds in the San Fernando Valley is examined by using stadia pibal observations and a network of continuously recording surface wind stations. This zone of convergence, marking the location where two sea breezes of different points of origin along the southern California coast meet each other, apparently produces rising motions. The pattern of flow in the vertical plane normal to the convergence line is constructed by applying the continuity equation to the wind data. This pattern prescribes a redistribution of a ground-based layer of pollution on the Los Angeles side of the zone of convergence. This redistribution is compared with the actual distribution as observed from aircraft.

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