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Jay S. Winston

Abstract

Statistics of planetary wave number and wave length as observed on 5-day mean 700-mb charts are presented for each ten degrees of latitude between 30N and 70N for each month of the year. These statistics show that there tend to be fewer waves around latitude circles in the colder half of the year. As might be expected from the variation in the length of latitude circles, there are more waves at tower latitudes than at high latitudes, but wave lengths are actually longer at middle and low latitudes than at high latitudes. The monthly and latitudinal variations in the longitudinal dimensions of waves are explained to a moderate degree by variations in physical parameters suggested by theoretical and laboratory models. Specifically, it has been found that wave length exhibits a direct relationship to thermal Rossby number, zonal wind speed in mid-troposphere, and static stability.

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Jay S. Winston

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No abstract available.

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THE CLIMATE OF SPRING 1982

A Season of Abnormally Strong Subtropical Westerlies

Jay S. Winston

Abstract

No abstract available.

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JAY S. WINSTON

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No Abstract Available.

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THE WEATHER AND CIRCULATION OF NOVEMBER 1953

A Month of Contrasting Regimes

JAY S. WINSTON

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No Abstract Available.

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JAY S. WINSTON

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JAY S. WINSTON

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THE WEATHER AND CIRCULATION OF DECEMBER 1953

A Month of Fast Westerly Flow

JAY S. WINSTON

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No Abstract Available.

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THE WEATHER AND CIRCULATION OF OCTOBER 1952

The Driest Month on Record in the United States

Jay S. Winston

Abstract

No Abstract Available.

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JAY S. WINSTON

Abstract

TIROS I photographs taken near the most intense stage of a cut-off cyclone over the eastern Pacific are examined relative to the standard observations and analyses in the area. Broad cloud bands seen in the southwestern portions of the cyclone have been found to be nearly perpendicular to the wind direction at both the surface and aloft, and to consist mainly of cumuliform cloudiness whose tops did not extend more than about 5,000 ft. above the sea surface. Examination of the photographs relative to the conventional frontal analysis and to vertical motions computed by a numerical prediction model suggests that satellite cloud pictures can lead to improvements in the standard analyses of surface and upper-air charts.

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