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Yanfeng Zhao, Donghai Wang, and Jianjun Xu

Abstract

A combined forecasting methodology, into which the spectral nudging, lateral boundary filtering, and update initial conditions methods are incorporated, was employed in the regional Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model. The intent was to investigate the potential for improving the prediction capability for the rainy season in China via using as many merits of the global model having better predictability as it does for the large-scale circulation and of the regional model as it does for the small-scale features. The combined methodology was found to be successful in improving the prediction of the regional atmospheric circulation and precipitation. It performed best for the larger magnitude precipitation, the relative humidity above 800 hPa, and wind fields below 300 hPa. Furthermore, the larger the magnitude and the longer the lead time, the more obvious is the improvement in terms of the accumulated rainfall of persistent severe rainfall events.

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Yanfeng Zhao, Donghai Wang, and Jianjun Xu

Abstract

Using the interior spectral nudging and update cycle (SN+UIC) methods in the regional Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model, the numerical predictions of four persistent severe rainfall (PSR) events during the preflood season in south China were investigated, based on the fact that the global model has an advantage in predicting the large-scale atmospheric variation and the regional model is better in terms of simulating small-scale changes. The simulation results clearly indicated that the SN+UIC improved the prediction of the PSR events’ daily precipitation for moderate, heavy, and torrential rains (10–100 mm day−1). It also improved the simulative forecasts of the two categories of rain with accumulated precipitation above 50 and 100 mm at lead times of 5–11 days. Moreover, the longer the forecast lead time is, the larger the decrease in the Brier score. Additionally, the SN+UIC method decreased the root-mean-square error for accumulated rainfall (6.2%) and relative humidity (5.67%).

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Xiaomin Xia, Jianjun Wang, Jiabin Ji, Jiexia Zhang, Liqi Chen, and Rui Zhang

Abstract

Although bacteria are an important biological component of aerosol particles, studies of bacterial communities in remote marine aerosol are largely lacking. In this study, aerosol samples were collected over the western Pacific Ocean, the northern Pacific Ocean, the Arctic Ocean, and the Norwegian Sea during the Fifth Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition (CHINARE 5). The diversity and structure of aerosol bacterial communities, based on 454 pyrosequencing, were explored in these samples. The bacterial community in the aerosols collected over the Pacific Ocean was more diverse than over the Norwegian Sea. Both temporal and spatial variations in aerosol bacterial communities were observed based on phylogenetic analysis. These results suggest that the source of air masses shape bacterial communities in aerosol particles over remote marine regions. Aerosols are clearly important for long-range transport of bacteria. Since potential human pathogens (e.g., Streptococcus sp.) were retrieved in this study, further investigation is needed to evaluate the potential for their long-distance migration via aerosol.

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Liqi Chen, Wei Li, Jianqiong Zhan, Jianjun Wang, Yuanhui Zhang, and Xulin Yang

Abstract

To investigate the concentrations, sources, and temporal variations of atmospheric black carbon (BC) in the summer Arctic, routine ground-level observations of BC by optical absorption were made in the summer from 2005 to 2008 at the Chinese Arctic “Yellow River” Station (78°55′N, 11°56′E) at Ny-Ålesund on the island of Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago. Methods of the ensemble empirical-mode decomposition analysis and back-trajectory analysis were employed to assess temporal variation embedded in the BC datasets and airmass transport patterns. The 10th-percentile and median values of BC concentrations were 7.2 and 14.6 ng m−3, respectively, and hourly average BC concentrations ranged from 2.5 to 54.6 ng m−3. A gradual increase was found by 4 ng m−3 a−1. This increase was not seen in the Zeppelin Station and it seemed to contrast with the prevalent conception of generally decreasing BC concentration since 1989 in the Arctic. Factors responsible for this increase such as changes in emissions and atmospheric transport were taken into consideration. The result indicated that BC from local emissions was mostly responsible for the observed increase from 2005 to 2008. BC temporal variation in the summer was controlled by the atmospheric circulation, which presented a significant 6–14-day variation and coherent with 1–3- and 2–5-day and longer cycle variation. Although the atmospheric circulation changes from 2005 to 2008, there was not a marked trend in long-range transportation of BC. This study suggested that local emissions might have significant implication for the regional radiative energy balance at Ny-Ålesund.

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Xiangzhou Song, Chunlin Ning, Yongliang Duan, Huiwu Wang, Chao Li, Yang Yang, Jianjun Liu, and Weidong Yu

Abstract

Six-month buoy-based heat flux observations from the poorly sampled tropical southeastern Indian Ocean are examined to document the extremes during three tropical cyclones (TCs) from December 2018 to May 2019. The most striking feature at the mooring site (16.9°S, 115.2°E) during the TCs is the extensively suppressed diurnal cycle of the net surface flux (Qnet), with a mean daytime (nighttime) reduction of 470 (131) W m−2, a peak decrease at approximately noon of 695 W m−2 and an extreme drop during TC Riley of 800 W m−2. The mean surface cooling in the daytime is primarily contributed by the 370 W m−2 decrease in shortwave radiation associated with the increased cloudiness. The air–sea turbulent heat fluxes increase by approximately 151 W m−2 in response to the enhanced wind speed under near-neutral boundary conditions. The daily mean rainfall-induced cooling is 8 W m−2, with a maximum magnitude of 90 W m−2. The mean values, seasonal variation, and synoptic variability of the characteristic heat fluxes are used to assess the new reanalysis data from ERA5 and MERRA2 and the analyzed OAFlux. The overall performance of the high-frequency net heat flux estimates at the synoptic scale is satisfactory, but the four flux components exhibit different quality levels. A serious error is that ERA5 and MERRA2 poorly represent TCs, and they show significant daily mean Qnet biases with opposite directions, −59 W m−2 (largely due to the overestimated latent heat with a bias of −76 W m−2) and 50 W m−2 (largely due to the overestimated shortwave radiation with a bias of 41 W m−2), respectively.

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Ming Feng, Yongliang Duan, Susan Wijffels, Je-Yuan Hsu, Chao Li, Huiwu Wang, Yang Yang, Hong Shen, Jianjun Liu, Chunlin Ning, and Weidong Yu

Abstract

Sea surface temperatures (SSTs) north of Australia in the Indonesian–Australian Basin are significantly influenced by Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO), an eastward-moving atmospheric disturbance that traverses the globe in the tropics. The region also has large-amplitude diurnal SST variations, which may influence the air–sea heat and moisture fluxes, that provide feedback to the MJO evolution. During the 2018/19 austral summer, a field campaign aiming to better understand the influences of air–sea coupling on the MJO was conducted north of Australia in the Indonesian–Australian Basin. Surface meteorology from buoy observations and upper-ocean data from autonomous fast-profiling float observations were collected. Two MJO convective phases propagated eastward across the region in mid-December 2018 and late January 2019 and the second MJO was in conjunction with a tropical cyclone development. Observations showed that SST in the region was rather sensitive to the MJO forcing. Air–sea heat fluxes warmed the SST throughout the 2018/19 austral summer, punctuated by the MJO activities, with a 2°–3°C drop in SST during the two MJO events. Substantial diurnal SST variations during the suppressed phases of the MJOs were observed, and the near-surface thermal stratifications provided positive feedback for the peak diurnal SST amplitude, which may be a mechanism to influence the MJO evolution. Compared to traditionally vessel-based observation programs, we have relied on fast-profiling floats as the main vehicle in measuring the upper-ocean variability from diurnal to the MJO time scales, which may pave the way for using cost-effective technology in similar process studies.

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Sid A. Boukabara, Tong Zhu, Hendrik L. Tolman, Steve Lord, Steven Goodman, Robert Atlas, Mitch Goldberg, Thomas Auligne, Bradley Pierce, Lidia Cucurull, Milija Zupanski, Man Zhang, Isaac Moradi, Jason Otkin, David Santek, Brett Hoover, Zhaoxia Pu, Xiwu Zhan, Christopher Hain, Eugenia Kalnay, Daisuke Hotta, Scott Nolin, Eric Bayler, Avichal Mehra, Sean P. F. Casey, Daniel Lindsey, Louie Grasso, V. Krishna Kumar, Alfred Powell, Jianjun Xu, Thomas Greenwald, Joe Zajic, Jun Li, Jinliong Li, Bin Li, Jicheng Liu, Li Fang, Pei Wang, and Tse-Chun Chen

Abstract

In 2011, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) began a cooperative initiative with the academic community to help address a vexing issue that has long been known as a disconnection between the operational and research realms for weather forecasting and data assimilation. The issue is the gap, more exotically referred to as the “valley of death,” between efforts within the broader research community and NOAA’s activities, which are heavily driven by operational constraints. With the stated goals of leveraging research community efforts to benefit NOAA’s mission and offering a path to operations for the latest research activities that support the NOAA mission, satellite data assimilation in particular, this initiative aims to enhance the linkage between NOAA’s operational systems and the research efforts. A critical component is the establishment of an efficient operations-to-research (O2R) environment on the Supercomputer for Satellite Simulations and Data Assimilation Studies (S4). This O2R environment is critical for successful research-to-operations (R2O) transitions because it allows rigorous tracking, implementation, and merging of any changes necessary (to operational software codes, scripts, libraries, etc.) to achieve the scientific enhancement. So far, the S4 O2R environment, with close to 4,700 computing cores (60 TFLOPs) and 1,700-TB disk storage capacity, has been a great success and consequently was recently expanded to significantly increase its computing capacity. The objective of this article is to highlight some of the major achievements and benefits of this O2R approach and some lessons learned, with the ultimate goal of inspiring other O2R/R2O initiatives in other areas and for other applications.

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