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Robert A. Pearson and John L. McGregor

Abstract

Numerical models of thermals usually introduce a closed box within which convection occurs. A boundary condition which allows inflow and outflow through the edges of the computational domain is discussed. The results of numerical experiments using this boundary condition are then compared and contrasted with those obtained when a rigid boundary is assumed. It is found that the flow development is especially sensitive to the choice of the upper boundary condition even before warm fluid reaches the top of the computational domain.

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Michael J. Uddstrom, John A. McGregor, Warren R. Gray, and John W. Kidson

Abstract

This paper reports on the first application of a multispectral textural Bayesian cloud classification algorithm (“SRTex”) to the general problem of the determination of high–spatial resolution cloud-amount and cloud-type climatological distributions. One year of NOAA-14 daylight passes over a region of complex topography (the South Island of New Zealand and adjacent ocean areas) is analyzed, and exploratory cloud-amount and -type climatological distributions are developed. When validated against a set of surface observations, the cloud-amount distributions have no significant bias at seasonal and yearly timescales, and explain between 70% (seasonal) and 90% (annual) of the spatial variance in the surface observations.

The cloud-amount distributions show strong land/sea contrasts. Lowest cloud frequencies are found in the lee of the major alpine feature in the analysis domain (the Southern Alps) and over mountain-sheltered valleys and adjacent sea areas. Over the oceans, cloud frequencies are highest over sub-Antarctic water masses, and range from 90% to 95%. However, over the sea adjacent to the coast on the western side of the Southern Alps, there is a distinct minimum in cloud amount that appears to be related to the orography.

The cloud-type climatological distributions are analyzed in terms of both simple frequency of occurrence and conditional frequency of occurrence, which is the frequency of occurrence as a fraction of the total number of times that the cloud type could have been observed. These distributions reveal the presence of preferred locations for some cloud types. There is strong evidence that uplift over major mountain ranges is a source of transmissive cirrus (enhancing occurrence by a factor of 2) and that the resulting cirrus coverage is most extensive and frequent in spring. Over the ocean areas, SST-related effects may determine the spatial distributions of stratocumulus, with higher frequencies observed over sub-Antarctic waters than over subtropical waters. Also, there is a positive correlation between mean cloud-top height and SST, but no similar relationship is found for other cloud types.

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Christopher J. Anderson, Raymond W. Arritt, Zaitao Pan, Eugene S. Takle, William J. Gutowski Jr., Francis O. Otieno, Renato da Silva, Daniel Caya, Jens H. Christensen, Daniel Lüthi, Miguel A. Gaertner, Clemente Gallardo, Filippo Giorgi, René Laprise, Song-You Hong, Colin Jones, H-M. H. Juang, J. J. Katzfey, John L. McGregor, William M. Lapenta, Jay W. Larson, John A. Taylor, Glen E. Liston, Roger A. Pielke Sr., and John O. Roads

Abstract

Thirteen regional climate model (RCM) simulations of June–July 1993 were compared with each other and observations. Water vapor conservation and precipitation characteristics in each RCM were examined for a 10° × 10° subregion of the upper Mississippi River basin, containing the region of maximum 60-day accumulated precipitation in all RCMs and station reports.

All RCMs produced positive precipitation minus evapotranspiration (PE > 0), though most RCMs produced PE below the observed range. RCM recycling ratios were within the range estimated from observations. No evidence of common errors of E was found. In contrast, common dry bias of P was found in the simulations.

Daily cycles of terms in the water vapor conservation equation were qualitatively similar in most RCMs. Nocturnal maximums of P and C (convergence) occurred in 9 of 13 RCMs, consistent with observations. Three of the four driest simulations failed to couple P and C overnight, producing afternoon maximum P. Further, dry simulations tended to produce a larger fraction of their 60-day accumulated precipitation from low 3-h totals.

In station reports, accumulation from high (low) 3-h totals had a nocturnal (early morning) maximum. This time lag occurred, in part, because many mesoscale convective systems had reached peak intensity overnight and had declined in intensity by early morning. None of the RCMs contained such a time lag. It is recommended that short-period experiments be performed to examine the ability of RCMs to simulate mesoscale convective systems prior to generating long-period simulations for hydroclimatology.

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Masashi Nagata, Lance Leslie, Yoshio Kurihara, Russell L. Elsberry, Masanori Yamasaki, Hirotaka Kamahori, Robert Abbey Jr., Kotaro Bessho, Javier Calvo, Johnny C. L. Chan, Peter Clark, Michel Desgagne, Song-You Hong, Detlev Majewski, Piero Malguzzi, John McGregor, Hiroshi Mino, Akihiko Murata, Jason Nachamkin, Michel Roch, and Clive Wilson

The Third Comparison of Mesoscale Prediction and Research Experiment (COMPARE) workshop was held in Tokyo, Japan, on 13–15 December 1999, cosponsored by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), Japan Science and Technology Agency, and the World Meteorological Organization. The third case of COMPARE focuses on an event of explosive tropical cyclone [Typhoon Flo (9019)] development that occurred during the cooperative three field experiments, the Tropical Cyclone Motion experiment 1990, Special Experiment Concerning Recurvature and Unusual Motion, and TYPHOON-90, conducted in the western North Pacific in August and September 1990. Fourteen models from nine countries have participated in at least a part of a set of experiments using a combination of four initial conditions provided and three horizontal resolutions. The resultant forecasts were collected, processed, and verified with analyses and observational data at JMA. Archived datasets have been prepared to be distributed to participating members for use in further evaluation studies.

In the workshop, preliminary conclusions from the evaluation study were presented and discussed in the light of initiatives of the experiment and from the viewpoints of tropical cyclone experts. Initial conditions, depending on both large-scale analyses and vortex bogusing, have a large impact on tropical cyclone intensity predictions. Some models succeeded in predicting the explosive deepening of the target typhoon at least qualitatively in terms of the time evolution of central pressure. Horizontal grid spacing has a very large impact on tropical cyclone intensity prediction, while the impact of vertical resolution is less clear, with some models being very sensitive and others less so. The structure of and processes in the eyewall clouds with subsidence inside as well as boundary layer and moist physical processes are considered important in the explosive development of tropical cyclones. Follow-up research activities in this case were proposed to examine possible working hypotheses related to the explosive development.

New strategies for selection of future COMPARE cases were worked out, including seven suitability requirements to be met by candidate cases. The VORTEX95 case was withdrawn as a candidate, and two other possible cases were presented and discussed.

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Keith A. Browning, Alan M. Blyth, Peter A. Clark, Ulrich Corsmeier, Cyril J. Morcrette, Judith L. Agnew, Sue P. Ballard, Dave Bamber, Christian Barthlott, Lindsay J. Bennett, Karl M. Beswick, Mark Bitter, Karen E. Bozier, Barbara J. Brooks, Chris G. Collier, Fay Davies, Bernhard Deny, Mark A. Dixon, Thomas Feuerle, Richard M. Forbes, Catherine Gaffard, Malcolm D. Gray, Rolf Hankers, Tim J. Hewison, Norbert Kalthoff, Samiro Khodayar, Martin Kohler, Christoph Kottmeier, Stephan Kraut, Michael Kunz, Darcy N. Ladd, Humphrey W. Lean, Jürgen Lenfant, Zhihong Li, John Marsham, James McGregor, Stephan D. Mobbs, John Nicol, Emily Norton, Douglas J. Parker, Felicity Perry, Markus Ramatschi, Hugo M. A. Ricketts, Nigel M. Roberts, Andrew Russell, Helmut Schulz, Elizabeth C. Slack, Geraint Vaughan, Joe Waight, David P. Wareing, Robert J. Watson, Ann R. Webb, and Andreas Wieser

The Convective Storm Initiation Project (CSIP) is an international project to understand precisely where, when, and how convective clouds form and develop into showers in the mainly maritime environment of southern England. A major aim of CSIP is to compare the results of the very high resolution Met Office weather forecasting model with detailed observations of the early stages of convective clouds and to use the newly gained understanding to improve the predictions of the model.

A large array of ground-based instruments plus two instrumented aircraft, from the U.K. National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS) and the German Institute for Meteorology and Climate Research (IMK), Karlsruhe, were deployed in southern England, over an area centered on the meteorological radars at Chilbolton, during the summers of 2004 and 2005. In addition to a variety of ground-based remote-sensing instruments, numerous rawinsondes were released at one- to two-hourly intervals from six closely spaced sites. The Met Office weather radar network and Meteosat satellite imagery were used to provide context for the observations made by the instruments deployed during CSIP.

This article presents an overview of the CSIP field campaign and examples from CSIP of the types of convective initiation phenomena that are typical in the United Kingdom. It shows the way in which certain kinds of observational data are able to reveal these phenomena and gives an explanation of how the analyses of data from the field campaign will be used in the development of an improved very high resolution NWP model for operational use.

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