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Ying Lin, Peter S. Ray, and Kenneth W. Johnson

Abstract

A method is developed to initialize convective storm simulations with Doppler radar-derived fields. Input fields for initialization include velocity, rainwater derived from radar reflectivity, and pressure and temperature fields obtained through thermodynamic retrieval. A procedure has been developed to fill in missing wind data, followed by a variational adjustment to the filled wind field to minimize “shocks” that would otherwise cause the simulated fields to deteriorate rapidly.

A series of experiments using data from a simulated storm establishes the feasibility of the initialization method. Multiple-Doppler radar observations from the 20 May 1977 Del City tornadic storm are used for the initialization experiments. Simulation results are shown and compared to observations taken at a later time. The simulated storm shows good agreement with the subsequent observations, though the simulated storm appears to be evolving faster than observed. Possible reasons for the discrepancies are discussed.

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Kenneth W. Johnson, Peter S. Ray, Brenda C. Johnson, and Robert P. Davies-Jones

Abstract

Observations of the 20 May 1977 tornadic storms are used to evaluate recent theories on the initiation of rotation at mid-and low levels and to verify recent thermodynamic retrieval results. Using the lengthy data record from a variety of sensors available for this day, it appears that the mechanism that initiates low-level rotation is different from that at midlevels. Attempts to identify the source of the low-level rotation as vertical tilting baroclinically generated horizontal vorticity were inconclusive.

The recent thermodynamic retrieval results of Hane and Ray and of Brandes for these storms are in good agreement with independent measurements where available. However, verification is hindered by the sparseness of these measurements. Noticeable differences in the region of the rear-flank downdraft suggest that there is room for improvement in the retrieval methods.

Investigation of the cyclic generation of rotation along gust fronts indicates that the source of low-level rotation is not derived from baroclinically generated horizontal vorticity as seems to be the case with the initial mesocyclone core. Instead, vertical vorticity amplification along the gust front leading to successive generation of mesocyclone cores and discrete mesocyclone propagation is the result of the concentration of low-level preexisting vertical vorticity through convergence.

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Kenneth S. Johnson, Joshua N. Plant, Stephen C. Riser, and Denis Gilbert

Abstract

Aanderaa optode sensors for dissolved oxygen show remarkable stability when deployed on profiling floats, but these sensors suffer from poor calibration because of an apparent drift during storage (storage drift). It has been suggested that measurement of oxygen in air, during the period when a profiling float is on the surface, can be used to improve sensor calibration and to determine the magnitude of sensor drift while deployed in the ocean. The effect of air calibration on oxygen measurement quality with 47 profiling floats that were equipped with Aanderaa oxygen optode sensors is assessed. Recalibrated oxygen concentration measurements were compared to Winkler oxygen titrations that were made at the float deployment stations and to the World Ocean Atlas 2009 oxygen climatology. Recalibration of the sensor using air oxygen reduces the sensor error, defined as the difference from Winkler oxygen titrations in the mixed layer near the time of deployment, by about tenfold when compared to errors obtained with the factory calibration. The relative error of recalibrated sensors is <1% in surface waters. A total of 29 floats were deployed for time periods in excess of one year in ice-free waters. Linear changes in the percent of atmospheric oxygen reported by the sensor, relative to the oxygen partial pressure expected from the NCEP air pressure, range from −0.9% to +1.3% yr−1 with a mean of 0.2% ± 0.5% yr−1. Given that storage drift for optode sensors is only negative, it is concluded that there is no evidence for sensor drift after they are deployed and that other processes are responsible for the linear changes.

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William W. Kellogg, David Atlas, David S. Johnson, Richard J. Reed, and Kenneth C. Spengler
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Kenneth S. Johnson, Luke J. Coletti, Hans W. Jannasch, Carole M. Sakamoto, Dana D. Swift, and Stephen C. Riser

Abstract

Reagent-free optical nitrate sensors [in situ ultraviolet spectrophotometer (ISUS)] can be used to detect nitrate throughout most of the ocean. Although the sensor is a relatively high-power device when operated continuously (7.5 W typical), the instrument can be operated in a low-power mode, where individual nitrate measurements require only a few seconds of instrument time and the system consumes only 45 J of energy per nitrate measurement. Operation in this mode has enabled the integration of ISUS sensors with Teledyne Webb Research's Autonomous Profiling Explorer (APEX) profiling floats with a capability to operate to 2000 m. The energy consumed with each nitrate measurement is low enough to allow 60 nitrate observations on each vertical profile to 1000 m. Vertical resolution varies from 5 m near the surface to 50 m near 1000 m, and every 100 m below that. Primary lithium batteries allow more than 300 vertical profiles from a depth of 1000 m to be made, which corresponds to an endurance near four years at a 5-day cycle time. This study details the experience in integrating ISUS sensors into Teledyne Webb Research's APEX profiling floats and the results that have been obtained throughout the ocean for periods up to three years.

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Yuichiro Takeshita, Brent D. Jones, Kenneth S. Johnson, Francisco P. Chavez, Daniel L. Rudnick, Marguerite Blum, Kyle Conner, Scott Jensen, Jacqueline S. Long, Thom Maughan, Keaton L. Mertz, Jeffrey T. Sherman, and Joseph K. Warren

Abstract

The California Current System is thought to be particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification, yet pH remains chronically undersampled along this coast, limiting our ability to assess the impacts of ocean acidification. To address this observational gap, we integrated the Deep-Sea-DuraFET, a solid-state pH sensor, onto a Spray underwater glider. Over the course of a year starting in April 2019, we conducted seven missions in central California that spanned 161 glider days and >1600 dives to a maximum depth of 1000 m. The sensor accuracy was estimated to be ± 0.01 based on comparisons to discrete samples taken alongside the glider (n = 105), and the precision was ±0.0016. CO2 partial pressure, dissolved inorganic carbon, and aragonite saturation state could be estimated from the pH data with uncertainty better than ± 2.5%, ± 8 μmol kg−1, and ± 2%, respectively. The sensor was stable to ±0.01 for the first 9 months but exhibited a drift of 0.015 during the last mission. The drift was correctable using a piecewise linear regression based on a reference pH field at 450 m estimated from published global empirical algorithms. These algorithms require accurate O2 as inputs; thus, protocols for a simple predeployment air calibration that achieved accuracy of better than 1% were implemented. The glider observations revealed upwelling of undersaturated waters with respect to aragonite to within 5 m below the surface near Monterey Bay. These observations highlight the importance of persistent observations through autonomous platforms in highly dynamic coastal environments.

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Molly Baringer, Mariana B. Bif, Tim Boyer, Seth M. Bushinsky, Brendan R. Carter, Ivona Cetinić, Don P. Chambers, Lijing Cheng, Sanai Chiba, Minhan Dai, Catia M. Domingues, Shenfu Dong, Andrea J. Fassbender, Richard A. Feely, Eleanor Frajka-Williams, Bryan A. Franz, John Gilson, Gustavo Goni, Benjamin D. Hamlington, Zeng-Zhen Hu, Boyin Huang, Masayoshi Ishii, Svetlana Jevrejeva, William E. Johns, Gregory C. Johnson, Kenneth S. Johnson, John Kennedy, Marion Kersalé, Rachel E. Killick, Peter Landschützer, Matthias Lankhorst, Tong Lee, Eric Leuliette, Feili Li, Eric Lindstrom, Ricardo Locarnini, Susan Lozier, John M. Lyman, John J. Marra, Christopher S. Meinen, Mark A. Merrifield, Gary T. Mitchum, Ben Moat, Didier Monselesan, R. Steven Nerem, Renellys C. Perez, Sarah G. Purkey, Darren Rayner, James Reagan, Nicholas Rome, Alejandra Sanchez-Franks, Claudia Schmid, Joel P. Scott, Uwe Send, David A. Siegel, David A. Smeed, Sabrina Speich, Paul W. Stackhouse Jr., William Sweet, Yuichiro Takeshita, Philip R. Thompson, Joaquin A. Triñanes, Martin Visbeck, Denis L. Volkov, Rik Wanninkhof, Robert A. Weller, Toby K. Westberry, Matthew J. Widlansky, Susan E. Wijffels, Anne C. Wilber, Lisan Yu, Weidong Yu, and Huai-Min Zhang
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