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Philip A. Durkee
,
Kevin J. Noone
, and
Robert T. Bluth

Abstract

In June 1994 the Monterey Area Ship Track (MAST) experiment was conducted off the coast of California to investigate the processes behind anthropogenic modification of cloud albedo. The motivation for the MAST experiment is described here, as well as details of the experimental design. Measurement platforms and strategies are explained, and a summary of experiment operations is presented. The experiment produced the largest dataset to date of direct measurements of the effects of ships on the microphysics and radiative properties of marine stratocumulus clouds as an analog for the indirect effects of anthropogenic pollution on cloud albedo.

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Hong Lin
,
Kevin J. Noone
,
Johan Ström
, and
Andrew J. Heymsfield

Abstract

An air parcel model has been used to study dynamic influences on cirrus cloud microphysical processes. Representative data selected from a measurement campaign carried out over southern Germany during March 1994 were used for a base-case model run where a modeled air parcel moved in a wave trajectory with a period similar to the measured Brunt–Väisälä frequency and an amplitude of about 30 m. Six case studies were performed for this paper. In each case, ice crystal nucleation processes were examined as an air parcel moved with trajectories having different wave forms. A random walk trajectory simulating turbulence with turbulent structure was also considered. The relationships between the parameters in the air parcel trajectories and crystal microphysical properties are discussed. Simulation results show that after two wave cycles, the model-produced crystal spectra are usually narrower than typical measurement data;however, broader spectra can be produced for certain types of trajectories. The broadness of crystal spectra is closely related to the air parcel’s initial position in the wave trajectory. It is not necessary to invoke entrainment to produce a broad crystal spectrum.

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Paul Glantz
,
Kevin J. Noone
, and
Simon R. Osborne

Abstract

Comparisons of counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) and forward scattering spectrometer probe (FSSP) measurements of cloud droplet number concentrations obtained by two different aircraft in marine boundary layer stratocumulus clouds are presented. The cut sizes of the CVIs have been calculated using a mathematical model ( D LH 50 ) and using Stokes' theory ( D S 50 ). For most of the cases the agreement between D LH 50 and D S 50 is within 3%. Based on the results obtained with the mathematical model the agreement between CVI and FSSP concentrations is within 25% for most of the cases analyzed in this study and also within 10% for several of the cases. The reasonable agreement between CVI and FSSP concentrations supports the assumption that a droplet releases a single residual particle upon evaporation. Furthermore, in this study it is shown that droplet shattering can qualitatively be identified and it occurs often when there are elevated concentrations of drizzle droplets in the clouds. Poor agreement between the CVI and FSSP was found in a few instances. For one of these cases the discrepancy obtained between the CVI and FSSP seems to have been caused by losses in the CVI mainly by cloud droplets with larger sizes.

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Elisabeth Öström
,
Kevin J. Noone
, and
Robert A. Pockalny

Abstract

The effect of marine boundary layer pollution level (as determined by the aerosol particle number concentration) on the size distribution of aerosol particles that formed cloud droplets in marine stratiform clouds is examined. In situ measurements of cloud droplet residual particles with a counterflow virtual impactor during the Monterey Area Ship Track experiment are presented. The variation in residual particle size distribution and number concentration in clouds that formed in marine boundary layers with different pollution levels are discussed. The measurements show a constant shape of the residual particle size distributions for the variety of pollution levels encountered, even though the aerosol number concentration varied by up to a factor of 6. The measurements indicate that particles smaller than 0.1-μm radius controlled cloud droplet number concentrations in the clouds investigated. From literature values of the maximum supersaturations encountered in stratocumulus clouds, one can estimate that the lower size limit of droplet-forming nuclei would only in extreme cases be lower than 0.01-μm radius. As a conservative estimate, the range of particle size controlling cloud droplet number concentrations in the encountered clouds was between 0.01 and 0.1 μm; in typical cases the lower size limit would be somewhat larger. The measurements also indicate that cloud droplet solute mass was determined by particles between circa 0.1 and 1.2 μm.

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Hong Lin
,
Kevin J. Noone
,
Johan Ström
, and
Andrew J. Heymsfield

Abstract

An air parcel model including homogeneous freezing nucleation of ice crystals has been used to study the formation and development of cirrus clouds. In situ measurements taken during March 1994 over southern Germany were used for comparison with model predictions. Typical experimental data were chosen for a base-case model run. Using measured aerosol properties as input values, the model predicts the measured ice crystal size distribution. In particular, both measurements and model results show the presence of numerous small ice crystals (diameter between 1 and 20 μm). Both measurements and model results also show that small aerosol particles (below 0.1 μm diameter) are active in forming cirrus cloud particles. The modeled microphysical properties including ice crystal size distribution, number concentration, and the residual particle size distribution are in good agreement with the experimental data. Based on the measured parameter values, a model sensitivity study considering air parcel updraft velocity, initial temperature, relative humidity, aerosol size distribution, number concentration, and air parcel vertical displacement is presented.

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Lynn M. Russell
,
Kevin J. Noone
,
Ronald J. Ferek
,
Robert A. Pockalny
,
Richard C. Flagan
, and
John H. Seinfeld

Abstract

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been sampled in marine stratiform clouds to identify the contribution of anthropogenic combustion emissions in activation of aerosol to cloud droplets. The Monterey Area Ship Track experiment provided an opportunity to acquire data on the role of organic compounds in ambient clouds and in ship tracks identified in satellite images. Identification of PAHs in cloud droplet residual samples indicates that several PAHs are present in cloud condensation nuclei in anthropogenically influenced air and do result in activated droplets in cloud. These results establish the presence of combustion products, such as PAHs, in submicrometer aerosols in anthropogenically influenced marine air, with enhanced concentrations in air polluted by ship effluent. The presence of PAHs in droplet residuals in anthropogenically influenced air masses indicates that some fraction of those combustion products is present in the cloud condensation nuclei that activate in cloud. Although a sufficient mass of droplet residuals was not collected to establish a similar role for organics from measurements in satellite-identified ship tracks, the available evidence from the fraction of organics present in the interstitial aerosol is consistent with part of the organic fraction partitioning to the droplet population. In addition, the probability that a compound will be found in cloud droplets rather than in the unactivated aerosol and the compound’s water solubility are compared. The PAHs studied are only weakly soluble in water, but most of the sparse data collected support more soluble compounds having a higher probability of activation.

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Carlos Nobre
,
Guy P. Brasseur
,
Melvyn A. Shapiro
,
Myanna Lahsen
,
Gilbert Brunet
,
Antonio J. Busalacchi
,
Kathy Hibbard
,
Sybil Seitzinger
,
Kevin Noone
, and
Jean P. Ometto

This paper discusses the development of a prediction system that integrates physical, biogeochemical, and societal processes in a unified Earth system framework. Such development requires collaborations among physical and social scientists, and should include i) the development of global Earth system analysis and prediction models that account for physical, chemical, and biological processes in a coupled atmosphere–ocean–land–ice system; ii) the development of a systematic framework that links the global climate and regionally constrained weather systems and the interactions and associated feedbacks with biogeochemistry, biology, and socioeconomic drivers (e.g., demography, global policy constraints, technological innovations) across scales and disciplines; and iii) the exploration and development of methodologies and models that account for societal drivers (e.g., governance, institutional dynamics) and their impacts and feedbacks on environmental and climate systems.

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Sarah J. Doherty
,
Stephan Bojinski
,
Ann Henderson-Sellers
,
Kevin Noone
,
David Goodrich
,
Nathaniel L. Bindoff
,
John A. Church
,
Kathy A. Hibbard
,
Thomas R. Karl
,
Lucka Kajfez-Bogataj
,
Amanda H. Lynch
,
David E. Parker
,
I. Colin Prentice
,
Venkatachalam Ramaswamy
,
Roger W. Saunders
,
Mark Stafford Smith
,
Konrad Steffen
,
Thomas F. Stocker
,
Peter W. Thorne
,
Kevin E. Trenberth
,
Michel M. Verstraete
, and
Francis W. Zwiers

The Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concluded that global warming is “unequivocal” and that most of the observed increase since the mid-twentieth century is very likely due to the increase in anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentrations, with discernible human influences on ocean warming, continental-average temperatures, temperature extremes, wind patterns, and other physical and biological indicators, impacting both socioeconomic and ecological systems. It is now clear that we are committed to some level of global climate change, and it is imperative that this be considered when planning future climate research and observational strategies. The Global Climate Observing System program (GCOS), the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP), and the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) therefore initiated a process to summarize the lessons learned through AR4 Working Groups I and II and to identify a set of high-priority modeling and observational needs. Two classes of recommendations emerged. First is the need to improve climate models, observational and climate monitoring systems, and our understanding of key processes. Second, the framework for climate research and observations must be extended to document impacts and to guide adaptation and mitigation efforts. Research and observational strategies specifically aimed at improving our ability to predict and understand impacts, adaptive capacity, and societal and ecosystem vulnerabilities will serve both purposes and are the subject of the specific recommendations made in this paper.

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Kevin J. Noone
,
Doug W. Johnson
,
Jonathan P. Taylor
,
Ronald J. Ferek
,
Tim Garrett
,
Peter V. Hobbs
,
Philip A. Durkee
,
Kurt Nielsen
,
Elisabeth Öström
,
Colin O’Dowd
,
Michael H. Smith
,
Lynn M. Russell
,
Richard C. Flagan
,
John H. Seinfeld
,
Lieve De Bock
,
René E. Van Grieken
,
James G. Hudson
,
Ian Brooks
,
Richard F. Gasparovic
, and
Robert A. Pockalny

Abstract

A case study of the effects of ship emissions on the microphysical, radiative, and chemical properties of polluted marine boundary layer clouds is presented. Two ship tracks are discussed in detail. In situ measurements of cloud drop size distributions, liquid water content, and cloud radiative properties, as well as aerosol size distributions (outside-cloud, interstitial, and cloud droplet residual particles) and aerosol chemistry, are presented. These are related to remotely sensed measurements of cloud radiative properties.

The authors examine the processes behind ship track formation in a polluted marine boundary layer as an example of the effects of anthropogenic particulate pollution on the albedo of marine stratiform clouds.

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Kevin J. Noone
,
Elisabeth Öström
,
Ronald J. Ferek
,
Tim Garrett
,
Peter V. Hobbs
,
Doug W. Johnson
,
Jonathan P. Taylor
,
Lynn M. Russell
,
Richard C. Flagan
,
John H. Seinfeld
,
Colin D. O’Dowd
,
Michael H. Smith
,
Philip A. Durkee
,
Kurt Nielsen
,
James G. Hudson
,
Robert A. Pockalny
,
Lieve De Bock
,
René E. Van Grieken
,
Richard F. Gasparovic
, and
Ian Brooks

Abstract

The effects of anthropogenic particulate emissions from ships on the radiative, microphysical, and chemical properties of moderately polluted marine stratiform clouds are examined. A case study of two ships in the same air mass is presented where one of the vessels caused a discernible ship track while the other did not. In situ measurements of cloud droplet size distributions, liquid water content, and cloud radiative properties, as well as aerosol size distributions (outside cloud, interstitial, and cloud droplet residual particles) and aerosol chemistry, are presented. These are related to measurements of cloud radiative properties. The differences between the aerosol in the two ship plumes are discussed;these indicate that combustion-derived particles in the size range of about 0.03–0.3-μm radius were those that caused the microphysical changes in the clouds that were responsible for the ship track.

The authors examine the processes behind ship track formation in a moderately polluted marine boundary layer as an example of the effects that anthropogenic particulate pollution can have in the albedo of marine stratiform clouds.

Full access