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P. B. Russell
,
M. P. McCormick
,
T. J. Swissler
,
J. M. Rosen
,
D. J. Hofmann
, and
L. R. McMaster

Abstract

A large satellite validation experiment was conducted at Poker Flat, Alaska, 16–19 July 1979. Instruments included the SAM II and SAGE satellite sensors, dustsondes impactors, a fitter collector and an airborne lidar. We show that the extinction profiles that were measured independently by SAM II and SAGE agree with each other. We then use a generalized optical model (which agrees with the Poker Flat optical absorption and relative size distribution measurements) to derive extinction profiles from the other measurements. Extinction profiles thus derived from the dustsonde, fitter and lidar measurements agree with the satellite-measured extinction profiles to within the combined uncertainties. (Individual 1 σ uncertainties are, at most heights, roughly 7 to 20% each for the satellite, dustsonde and filter measurements, 30 to 60% for the lidar measurements, and 10 to 20% for the process of converting one measured parameter to another using the optical model.)

The wire impactor-derived results are also consistent with the other results, but the comparison is coarse because of the relatively large uncertainties (±35% to a factor of 4) in impactor-derived mass, extinction, N 0.15 and N 0.25 (Nx is the number of particles per unit volume with radius greater than x μm.) These uncertainties apply to background stratospheric aerosol size distributions, and result primarily from relatively small uncertainties (±8 to ±20% for confidence limits of 95%) in radii assigned to impacted particles, combined with the steepness of background size distributions in the radius range that contributes most to mass, extinction, N 0.15 and N 0.25. Polar nephelometer-measured asymmetry parameters (0.4 to 0.6) agree with a previous balloon photometer inference, but are significantly less than the value (∼0.7) obtained from Mie scattering calculations assuming either model or measured size distributions.

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M. P. McCormick
,
Patrick Hamill
,
T. J Pepin
,
W. P. Chu
,
T. J Swissler
, and
L. R. McMaster

The potential climatological and environmental importance of the stratospheric aerosol layer has prompted great interest in measuring the properties of this aerosol. In this paper we report on two recently deployed NASA satellite systems (SAM II and SAGE) that are monitoring the stratospheric aerosol. The satellite orbits are such that nearly global coverage is obtained. The instruments mounted in the spacecraft are sun photometers that measure solar intensity at specific wavelengths as it is moderated by atmospheric particulates and gases during each sunrise and sunset encountered by the satellites. The data obtained are “inverted” to yield vertical aerosol and gaseous (primarily ozone) extinction profiles with 1 km vertical resolution. Thus, latitudinal, longitudinal, and temporal variations in the aerosol layer can be evaluated. The satellite systems are being validated by a series of ground truth experiments using airborne and ground lidar, balloon-borne dustsondes, aircraft-mounted impactors, and other correlative sensors. We describe the SAM II and SAGE satellite systems, instrument characteristics, and mode of operation; outline the methodology of the experiments; and describe the ground truth experiments. We present preliminary results from these measurements.

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P.B. Russell
,
M.P. McCormick
,
T.J. Swissler
,
W.P. Chu
,
J.M. Livingston
,
W.H. Fuller
,
J.M. Rosen
,
D.J. Hofmann
,
L.R. McMaster
,
D.C. Woods
, and
T.J. Pepin

Abstract

We show results from the first set of measurements conducted to validate extinction data from the satellite sensor SAM II. Dustsonde-measured number density profiles and lidar-measured backscattering profiles for two days are converted to extinction profiles using the optical modeling techniques described in the companion Paper I (Russell et al., 1981). At heights ∼2 km and more above the tropopause, the dustsonde data are used to restrict the range of model size distributions, thus reducing uncertainties in the conversion process. At all heights, measurement uncertainties for each sensor are evaluated, and these are combined with conversion uncertainties to yield the total uncertainty in derived data profiles.

The SAM II measured, dustsonde-inferred, and lidar-inferred extinction profiles for both days are shown to agree within their respective uncertainties at all heights above the tropopause. Near the tropopause, this agreement depends on the use of model size distributions with more relatively large particles (radius ≳0.6 μm) than are present in distributions used to model the main stratospheric aerosol peak. The presence of these relatively large particles is supported by measurements made elsewhere and is suggested by in situ size distribution measurements reported here. These relatively large particles near the tropopause are likely to have an important bearing on the radiative impact of the total stratospheric aerosol.

The agreement in this experiment supports the validity of the SAM II extinction data and the SAM II uncertainty estimates derived from an independent error analysis. Recommendations are given for reducing the uncertainties of future correlative experiments.

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