Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: L.L. Gordley x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search
James M. Russell III and Larry L. Gordley

Abstract

An inversion algorithm has been developed to simultaneously infer the concentrations of two gases with overlapping spectral signatures using limb emission measurements. The algorithm is efficient and provides a solution in two or three iterations. It has been tested in a simulation study for the inference of stratospheric NO2–H2 and HNO3–CF(2CL2 Existing satellite instrumentation was the basis for errors used in the calculations. These included noise, scale and bias errors, angular registration errors, spacecraft motion effects, and effects due to a finite instrument field of view. It is estimated that concentrations of all four gases can be measured globally from a satellite with errors of less than 20%.

Full access
Ellis Remsberg, James M. Russell III, Larry L. Gordley, John C. Gille, and Paul L. Bailey

Abstract

The LIMS experiment on Nimbus 7 has provided new results on the stratospheric water vapor distribution. The data show 1) a latitudinal gradient with mixing ratios that increase by a factor of 2 from equator to ±60 degrees at 50 mb, 2) most of the time there is a fairly uniform mixing ratio of 5 ppmv at high latitudes, but more variation exists during winter, 3) a well-developed hygropause at low to midlatitudes of the lower stratosphere 4) a source region of water vapor in the upper stratosphere to lower mesosphere that is consistent with methane oxidation chemistry, at least within the uncertainties of the data, 5) an apparent zonal mean H2O distribution that is consistent with the circulation proposed by Brewer in 1949, and 6) a zonal mean distribution in the lower stratosphere that is consistent with the idea of quasi-isentropic transport by eddies in the meridional direction. Limits to the use of the data in the refinement of our understanding of the stratospheric water vapor budget are noted.

Full access
C.B. Leovy, C-R. Sun, M.H. Hitchman, E.E. Remsberg, J.M. Russell, III, L.L. Gordley, J.C. Gille, and L.V. Lyjak

Abstract

Data from the Nimbus 7 Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) for the period 25 October 1978–28 May 1979 are used in a descriptive study of ozone variations in the middle stratosphere. It is shown that the ozone distribution is strongly influenced by irreversible deformation associated with large amplitude planetary-scale waves. This process, which has been described by McIntyre and Palmer as planetary wave breaking, takes place throughout the 3–30 mb layer, and poleward transport of ozone within this layer occurs in narrow tongues drawn out of the tropics and subtropics in association with major and minor warming events. Thew events complement the zonal mean diabatic circulation in producing significant changes in the total column amount of ozone.

Full access