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Lee R. Hoxit

Abstract

Systematic stratifications and analyses of low-level radiosonde data are performed for portions of the eastern half of the United States. The procedures are designed to specify changes in the planetary boundary layer wind profile resulting from variations in baroclinicity. The angle between the winds and isobars, the ageostrophic wind components, the surface stress, and the surface wind speeds are all shown to be functions of the orientation of the thermal wind vector relative to the surface geostrophic wind. These variations are consistent with a mixing-length model of the additional turbulent momentum transport initiated by the vertical shear of the geostrophic wind.

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Lee R. Hoxit and Robert M. Henry

Abstract

Rocketsonde temperature data taken during the period 1964–69 at White Sands, N. M., Cape Kennedy, Fla., and Wallops Island, Va., are stratified into 10 day and 10 night intervals and then averaged to give mean diurnal temperature curves at 5-km intervals from 30 to 60 km. Representative values of solar radiation errors are eliminated from all the daytime observations. The results show diurnal temperature ranges of 4.7, 3.6, 4.3, 8.9, 6.8, 7.2 and 8.9K at 30, 35, 40, 45,50, 55 and 60 km, respectively. The temperature maxima occur from 1–3 hr after local noon. The temperature minima occur 1–2 hr before sunrise below the stratopause and shortly after midnight above the stratopause.

Adjustments for systematic temperature errors and diurnal variations are applied to mean monthly temperatures (based on midday data only) to give estimates of the true monthly means. The January and July mean temperatures for the three stations are compared with the model atmospheres published in the U. S. Standard Atmosphere Supplements (1966).

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Lee R. Hoxit, J. Michael Fritsch, and Charles F. Chappell

Abstract

No abstract available.

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Lee R. Hoxit, Charles F. Chappell, and J. Michael Fritsch

Abstract

Correction to Volume 104, Issue 11, Article 1408.

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Robert A. Maddox, Lee R. Hoxit, Charles F. Chappell, and Fernando Caracena

Abstract

Analyses and descriptions of the meteorological conditions that produced devastating flash floods in the Big Thompson Canyon on 31 July 1976 and in the Black Hills on 9 June 1972 are presented. The storms developed when strong low-level easterly winds pushed moist, conditionally unstable air masses upslope into elevated, mountainous terrain. Orographic uplift released the convective instability and light winds aloft allowed the storm complexes to remain nearly stationary. Meteorological conditions that produced these flash floods were found to have been very similar. A set of meteorological features is defined for the purpose of identifying the potential for this type flash flood along the eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains.

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