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M. Balser and D. Netterville

Abstract

Doppler-acoustic radars generally process received scattered signals for an interval on the order of a few minutes to estimate the wind remotely. Until now, the procedure has been used to measure mean winds over this interval. This paper analyzes the relationship between the statistical properties of the acoustic signal and the wind components so as to include the second moment, or wind variations, in addition to the first moment, or mean. Measurements of wind variability by a Doppler-acoustic radar were carried out by a specified technique, and were found to be well correlated with those taken at an instrumented tower.

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M. Balser, C. A. McNary, and D. Anderson

Abstract

A Doppler acoustic system was installed on the approach to the Los Angeles International Airport in a demonstration of its capability of remotely measuring wind and wind shear in a real airport environment. The instrument continued to read valid 1 min averages of wind even when aircraft passed overhead directly through the receiver beams. An example is shown in which the observed wind was highly variable in altitude and time, and would at times have constituted a dangerous wind shear.

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M. Balser, C. A. McNary, A. E. Nagy, R. Loveland, and D. Dickson

Abstract

Acoustic radar offers a promising new technique for remotely measuring vector wind velocity. Engineered antenna systems have been constructed that effectively reject noise interference, and the corresponding detection logic has been developed that identifies the wind velocity from the processed signal. Recent tests employed an acoustic radar to measure the wind velocity in close proximity to conventional anemometer and vane instrumentation. Comparison between the measurements from the two sensors shows a high degree of correlation; the observed differences are also discussed.

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