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Michael S. Moss

Abstract

Turbulent low-level properties, as determined from aircraft measurements on 17 September 1975, are presented for a peripheral portion of Hurricane Eloise. Application of the Deardorff (1972b) planetary boundary layer parameterization scheme to the mean data indicates that the shear production of turbulence is far greater than that due to buoyancy. it is inferred from an examination of the terms contributing to the energy budget for the upper mixed-layer levels that the vertical shear production of turbulence principally occurs in the surface layer. The surface stress calculated from Deardorff's approach is almost identical to that observed from the momentum flux profile. This profile also shows that the top of the mixed layer is delineated by a vanishing stress, in agreement with previous undisturbed trade wind environment observations.

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Michael S. Moss and Stanley L. Rosenthal

Abstract

Using data from Hurricanes Daisy 1958 and Inez 1966, we have applied Deardorff's (1972b) planetary boundary layer parameterization scheme to compute the surface exchange coefficients for these storms. The drag coefficients compare quite well with previous budget study estimates provided we assume that Charnock's (1955) or Cardone's (1969) relation for the roughness length is valid.

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Michael S. Moss and Francis J. Merceret

Abstract

Velocity spectra obtained from a hot-film anemometer and a gust probe on board the NOAA DC-6 (39C) during a research mission into Hurricane Eloise 1975 are compared at common frequencies. The spectra compare reasonably well, thus justifying some confidence in measurements acquired from the individual instruments.

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Michael S. Moss and Francis J. Merceret

Abstract

Low-level flight data from a small cloud-free area along the periphery of Hurricane Eloise (1975) reveal the existence of a well-mixed boundary layer which is capped by a near-isothermal layer. The isothermal layer is probably created by the combined effect of subsiding air and surface-induced turbulence.

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