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Michael Steele
and
Wendy Ermold

Abstract

Ocean temperature and salinity data over the period 1950–2000 in the Northern Seas, defined here as the North Atlantic Ocean (north of 50°N), North Pacific Ocean (north of 40°N), and Arctic Oceans, are combined to diagnose the steric (i.e., density) contribution to sea level variation. The individual contributions to steric height from temperature (thermosteric height) and salinity (halosteric height) are also analyzed. It is found that during 1950–2000, steric height rose over the study’s domain, mostly as a result of halosteric increases (i.e., freshening). Over a shorter time period (late 1960s to early 1990s) during which climate indices changed dramatically, steric height gradients near the Nordic Seas minimum were reduced by 18%–32%. It is speculated that this may be associated with a local slowing of both the Meridional Overturning Circulation and the southward flow through Fram Strait. However, steric height increases in the North Pacific Ocean during this time imply a possible acceleration of flow through the poorly measured Canadian Arctic. Evidence that the Great Salinity Anomaly of the late 1960s and 1970s had two distinct Arctic Ocean sources is also found: a late 1960s export of sea ice, and a delayed but more sustained 1970s export of liquid (ocean) freshwater. A simple calculation indicates that these Arctic Ocean freshwater sources were not sufficient to create the 1970s freshening observed in the North Atlantic Ocean.

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Jinlun Zhang
,
Drew Rothrock
, and
Michael Steele

Abstract

It is well established that periods of high North Atlantic oscillation (NAO) index are characterized by a weakening of the surface high pressure and surface anticyclone in the Beaufort Sea and the intensification of the cyclonic circulation in the eastern Arctic Ocean. The response of Arctic sea ice to these atmospheric changes has been studied with a thickness distribution sea-ice model coupled to an ocean model. During a period of high NAO, 1989–96, the model shows a substantial reduction of ice advection into the eastern Arctic from the Canada Basin, and an increase of ice export through Fram Strait, both of which tend to deplete thick ice in the eastern Arctic Ocean and enhance it in the western Arctic, in an uneven dipolar pattern we call the East–West Arctic Anomaly Pattern (EWAAP). From the period 1979–88 with a lower-NAO index to the period 1988–96 with a high-NAO index, the simulated ice volume in the eastern Arctic drops by about a quarter, while that in the western Arctic increases by 16%. Overall, the Arctic Ocean loses 6%. The change from 1987 to 1996 is even larger—a loss of some 20% in ice volume for the whole Arctic. Both the model and satellite data show a significant reduction in ice extent in the eastern Arctic and in the Arctic Ocean as a whole.

There are corresponding changes in open water and therefore in ice growth, which tend to moderate the anomaly, and in lateral melting, which tends to enhance the anomaly. During the high NAO and strong EWAAP period, 1989–96, the eastern (western) Arctic has more (less) open water and enhanced (reduced) winter ice growth, so ice growth stabilizes the ice cover. On the other hand, the increased (decreased) open water enhances (reduces) summer melt by lowering (increasing) albedo in the eastern (western) Arctic. The nonlinearity of ice– albedo feedback causes the increased summer melt in the eastern Arctic to dominate the thermodynamic response and to collaborate with the ice advection pattern to enhance the EWAAP during high NAO.

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Michael Steele
,
Rebecca Morley
, and
Wendy Ermold

Abstract

A new gridded ocean climatology, the Polar Science Center Hydrographic Climatology (PHC), has been created that merges the 1998 version of the World Ocean Atlas with the new regional Arctic Ocean Atlas. The result is a global climatology for temperature and salinity that contains a good description of the Arctic Ocean and its environs. Monthly, seasonal, and annual average products have been generated. How the original datasets were prepared for merging, how the optimal interpolation procedure was performed, and characteristics of the resulting dataset are discussed, followed by a summary and discussion of future plans.

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Michael Steele
and
James H. Morison

Abstract

SALARGOS buoys that measure upper-ocean temperature and salinity in ice-covered seas have been collecting data in the Arctic basin for several years. The buoys consist of a 300-m-long string of six temperature-conductivity sensors at fixed depths, with a pressure sensor at the bottom. The electronics housing, including an Argos transmitter, is frozen into the sea ice. The buoy drifts with the sea ice, sampling a region described by the Lagrangian drift of the surrounding ice pack. When the ice is moving slowly, the relative water velocity in the upper ocean is low and the buoy simply produces hydrographic time series at six depths. In periods of rapid drift the buoy cable is displaced upward and the sensors sample other depths. Collecting such data over time can produce plots with relatively high vertical resolution. But to use this information, one needs a reasonable curve fit to these data similar to a smoothed version of a CTD (conductivity-temperature-depth) cast. Two methods have been investigated parametric regression analysis and nonparametric smoothing routines. The quality of the parametric fits depends in part on the choice of analytical profile, as is demonstrated here by comparing the efficacy of a common three-parameter model with a more complete five-parameter model. Both share the advantage of containing explicit geophysical quantities (such as mixed-layer depth) as the free parameters of the system. The nonpammetric smoother, on the other hand, assumes no a priori knowledge of the underlying physics. The data are smoothed and interpolated onto a grid of depth values in a procedure that includes both median and mean running fitters, which results in a relatively small standard error. The standard error for the parametric routines is larger by a factor of 2 or 3, but these schemes produce better estimates of geophysical parameters such as mixed-layer depth. Either technique could also be used to gain enhanced vertical resolution with bottom-moored ocean buoys.

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Michael Steele
,
George L. Mellor
, and
Miles G. Mcphee

Abstract

In an earlier paper, a second-moment turbulence closure model was applied to the problem of the dynamic and thermodynamic interaction of sea ice and the ocean surface mixed layer. An overly simplistic parameterization of the molecular sublayers of temperature and salinity within the mixed layer was used. This paper investigates the use of a more recent parameterization by Yaglom and Kader which is supported by laboratory data. A relatively low melt rate results in the case where ice overlays warm water. This agrees with some recent observations in the interior of the marginal ice zone.

A surface heat sink drives the freezing case which, due to the large difference in heat and salt molecular diffusivities, produces a strong supercooling effect. This is converted into an estimate of frazil ice production through a simple scheme. The model results provide an explanation for high frazil ice concentrations observed in the Arctic and Antarctic.

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George L. Mellor
,
Miles G. McPhee
, and
Michael Steele

Abstract

A second-moment, turbulence closure model is applied to the problem of the dynamic and thermodynamic interaction of sea ice and the ocean surface mixed layer. In the case of ice moving over a warm, ocean surface layer, melting is intrinsically a transient process; that is, melting is rapid when warm surface water initially contacts the ice. Then the process slows when surface water is insulated from deeper water due to the stabilizing effect of the melt water, and the thermal energy stored in the surface layer is depleted. Effectively, the same process prevails when ocean surface water flows under stationary ice in which case, after an initial rapid increase, the melting process decreases with downstream distance. Accompanying the stabilizing effect of the melt water is a reduction in the ice-seawater interfacial shear stress. This process and model simulators are used to explain field observations wherein ice near the marginal ice zone diverges from the main pack.

When the surface ice layer is made to grow by imposing heat conduction through the ice, the surface ocean layer is destabilized by brine rejection and mixing in the water column is enhanced. The heat flux into the water column is a small percentage of the heat conduction through the ice.

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Viva Banzon
,
Thomas M. Smith
,
Michael Steele
,
Boyin Huang
, and
Huai-Min Zhang

Abstract

Arctic sea surface temperatures (SSTs) are estimated mostly from satellite sea ice concentration (SIC) estimates. In regions with sea ice the SST is the temperature of open water or of the water under the ice. A number of different proxy SST estimates based on SIC have been developed. In recent years more Arctic quality-control buoy SSTs have become available, allowing better validation of different estimates and the development of improved proxy estimates. Here proxy SSTs from different approaches are evaluated and an improved proxy SST method is shown. The improved proxy SSTs were tested in an SST analysis, and showed reduced bias and random errors compared to the Arctic buoy SSTs. Almost all reduction in errors is in the warm melt season. In the cold season the SIC is typically high and all estimates tend to have low errors. The improved method will be incorporated into an operational SST analysis.

Open access
Maude Dinan
,
Emile Elias
,
Nicholas P. Webb
,
Greg Zwicke
,
Timothy S. Dye
,
Skye Aney
,
Michael Brady
,
Joel R. Brown
,
Robert R. Dobos
,
Dave DuBois
,
Brandon L. Edwards
,
Sierra Heimel
,
Nicholas Luke
,
Caitlin M. Rottler
, and
Caitriana Steele
Full access
Michael Steele
,
Hajo Eicken
,
Uma Bhatt
,
Peter Bieniek
,
Ed Blanchard-Wrigglesworth
,
Helen Wiggins
,
Betsy Turner-Bogren
,
Lawrence Hamilton
,
Joseph Little
,
François Massonnet
,
Walter N. Meier
,
James Overland
,
Mark Serreze
,
Julienne Stroeve
,
John Walsh
, and
Muyin Wang
Open access
Peter A. Bieniek
,
Uma S. Bhatt
,
Donald A. Walker
,
Martha K. Raynolds
,
Josefino C. Comiso
,
Howard E. Epstein
,
Jorge E. Pinzon
,
Compton J. Tucker
,
Richard L. Thoman
,
Huy Tran
,
Nicole Mölders
,
Michael Steele
,
Jinlun Zhang
, and
Wendy Ermold

Abstract

The mechanisms driving trends and variability of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) for tundra in Alaska along the Beaufort, east Chukchi, and east Bering Seas for 1982–2013 are evaluated in the context of remote sensing, reanalysis, and meteorological station data as well as regional modeling. Over the entire season the tundra vegetation continues to green; however, biweekly NDVI has declined during the early part of the growing season in all of the Alaskan tundra domains. These springtime declines coincide with increased snow depth in spring documented in northern Alaska. The tundra region generally has warmed over the summer but intraseasonal analysis shows a decline in midsummer land surface temperatures. The midsummer cooling is consistent with recent large-scale circulation changes characterized by lower sea level pressures, which favor increased cloud cover. In northern Alaska, the sea-breeze circulation is strengthened with an increase in atmospheric moisture/cloudiness inland when the land surface is warmed in a regional model, suggesting the potential for increased vegetation to feedback onto the atmospheric circulation that could reduce midsummer temperatures. This study shows that both large- and local-scale climate drivers likely play a role in the observed seasonality of NDVI trends.

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