Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: Mio Matsueda x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Ryo Mizuta, Mio Matsueda, Hirokazu Endo, and Seiji Yukimoto

Abstract

Future changes in Northern Hemisphere wintertime storm activity as a consequence of global warming are investigated using the AGCM of Meteorological Research Institute (MRI-AGCM) with horizontal grid sizes of 60 and 20 km. A future (2075–99) climate experiment, in which the change in sea surface temperature (SST) derived from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3) multimodel ensemble mean is added to observed SST, is compared with a present-day (1979–2003) climate experiment. Results of three-member simulations using the 60-km model are presented. A single simulation using the 20-km model is also presented, showing that similar results are obtained.

In the future climate experiment, the number of intense cyclones (sea level pressure below 980 hPa) shows a significant increase whereas the number of total cyclones shows a significant decrease, similar to the results obtained from the CMIP3 models themselves. The increase in intense cyclones is seen on the polar side and downstream side of Atlantic and Pacific storm tracks. At the same time, the growth rate of the cyclones increases in areas upstream of these regions.

For the regions with the increasing growth rate, a high correlation is seen between the growth rate of the surface cyclones and upper-tropospheric zonal wind at a monthly-mean time scale. Months of high cyclone growth rate with strong zonal wind in these regions become more frequent, and months of low cyclone growth rate with weak zonal wind become less frequent. One of the possibilities that can explain this relationship is changes in the wave-breaking pattern, that is, a decrease in wave breakings in areas of cyclonic shear and an increase in wave breakings in areas of anticyclonic shear. Associated with these changes, rapid cyclone developments are more commonly seen, and weak, long-lived cyclones become less frequent.

Full access
Mio Matsueda, Masayuki Kyouda, Zoltan Toth, H. L. Tanaka, and Tadashi Tsuyuki

Abstract

Atmospheric blocking occurred over the Rocky Mountains at 1200 UTC 15 December 2005. The operational medium-range ensemble forecasts of the Canadian Meteorological Center (CMC), the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), as initialized at 1200 UTC 10 December 2005, showed remarkable differences regarding this event. All of the NCEP members failed to predict the correct location of the blocking, whereas almost all of the JMA members and most of the CMC members were successful in predicting the correct location. The present study investigated the factors that caused NCEP to incorrectly predict the blocking location, based on an ensemble-based sensitivity analysis and the JMA global spectral model (GSM) multianalysis ensemble forecasts with NCEP, regionally amplified NCEP, and globally amplified NCEP analyses.

A sensitive area for the blocking formation was detected over the central North Pacific. In this area, the NCEP control analysis experienced problems in the handling of a cutoff cyclone, and the NCEP initial perturbations were ineffective in reducing uncertainties in the NCEP control analysis. The JMA GSM multianalysis ensemble forecasts revealed that regional amplification of initial perturbations over the sensitive area could lead to further improvements in forecasts over the blocking region without degradation of forecasts over the Northern Hemisphere (NH), whereas the global amplification of initial perturbations could lead to improved forecasts over the blocking region and degraded forecasts over the NH. This finding may suggest that excessive amplification of initial perturbations over nonsensitive areas is undesirable, and that case-dependent rescaling of initial perturbations may be of value compared with climatology-based rescaling, which is widely used in current operational ensemble prediction systems.

Full access
Reinhard Schiemann, Marie-Estelle Demory, Len C. Shaffrey, Jane Strachan, Pier Luigi Vidale, Matthew S. Mizielinski, Malcolm J. Roberts, Mio Matsueda, Michael F. Wehner, and Thomas Jung

Abstract

The aim of this study is to investigate if the representation of Northern Hemisphere blocking is sensitive to resolution in current-generation atmospheric global circulation models (AGCMs). An evaluation is conducted of how well atmospheric blocking is represented in four AGCMs whose horizontal resolution is increased from a grid spacing of more than 100 km to about 25 km. It is shown that Euro-Atlantic blocking is simulated overall more credibly at higher resolution (i.e., in better agreement with a 50-yr reference blocking climatology created from the reanalyses ERA-40 and ERA-Interim). The improvement seen with resolution depends on the season and to some extent on the model considered. Euro-Atlantic blocking is simulated more realistically at higher resolution in winter, spring, and autumn, and robustly so across the model ensemble. The improvement in spring is larger than that in winter and autumn. Summer blocking is found to be better simulated at higher resolution by one model only, with little change seen in the other three models. The representation of Pacific blocking is not found to systematically depend on resolution. Despite the improvements seen with resolution, the 25-km models still exhibit large biases in Euro-Atlantic blocking. For example, three of the four 25-km models underestimate winter northern European blocking frequency by about one-third. The resolution sensitivity and biases in the simulated blocking are shown to be in part associated with the mean-state biases in the models’ midlatitude circulation.

Open access
Reinhard Schiemann, Marie-Estelle Demory, Len C. Shaffrey, Jane Strachan, Pier Luigi Vidale, Matthew S. Mizielinski, Malcolm J. Roberts, Mio Matsueda, Michael F. Wehner, and Thomas Jung
Full access
Richard Swinbank, Masayuki Kyouda, Piers Buchanan, Lizzie Froude, Thomas M. Hamill, Tim D. Hewson, Julia H. Keller, Mio Matsueda, John Methven, Florian Pappenberger, Michael Scheuerer, Helen A. Titley, Laurence Wilson, and Munehiko Yamaguchi

Abstract

The International Grand Global Ensemble (TIGGE) was a major component of The Observing System Research and Predictability Experiment (THORPEX) research program, whose aim is to accelerate improvements in forecasting high-impact weather. By providing ensemble prediction data from leading operational forecast centers, TIGGE has enhanced collaboration between the research and operational meteorological communities and enabled research studies on a wide range of topics.

The paper covers the objective evaluation of the TIGGE data. For a range of forecast parameters, it is shown to be beneficial to combine ensembles from several data providers in a multimodel grand ensemble. Alternative methods to correct systematic errors, including the use of reforecast data, are also discussed.

TIGGE data have been used for a range of research studies on predictability and dynamical processes. Tropical cyclones are the most destructive weather systems in the world and are a focus of multimodel ensemble research. Their extratropical transition also has a major impact on the skill of midlatitude forecasts. We also review how TIGGE has added to our understanding of the dynamics of extratropical cyclones and storm tracks.

Although TIGGE is a research project, it has proved invaluable for the development of products for future operational forecasting. Examples include the forecasting of tropical cyclone tracks, heavy rainfall, strong winds, and flood prediction through coupling hydrological models to ensembles.

Finally, the paper considers the legacy of TIGGE. We discuss the priorities and key issues in predictability and ensemble forecasting, including the new opportunities of convective-scale ensembles, links with ensemble data assimilation methods, and extension of the range of useful forecast skill.

Full access