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NEIL L. FRANK

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Neil L. Frank

Abstract

The 1974 hurricane season produced 96 “tropical systems,” of which 25 acquired the closed circulation of a depression. The origin of nearly half of these, 52, was over the continent of Africa. African seedlings initiated five of the seven named Atlantic storms, and disturbances of Atlantic origin spawned 12 of the 17 East Pacific named storms.

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NEIL L. FRANK

Abstract

On September 12, 1961, an unnamed tropical cyclone formed over the northern Bahama Islands, then moved northward reaching the North Carolina coast near Wilmington on September 14. TIROS satellite pictures of the formation area are available every 24 hr. for a 5-day period extending from September 10 to 14. Some of the problems in fitting satellite pictures to a rather complicated synoptic pattern are discussed. Development occurred within the confines of a cold Low which existed in the upper troposphere. Comments are made on this process, and in particular, on the role played by the upper tropospheric anticyclone.

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NEIL L. FRANK

Abstract

The 1971 hurricane season featured 103 seedlings, 23 depressions, and 12 named storms. An anomalous circulation pattern developed over the Gulf of Mexico and the southwestern Atlantic Ocean in September and spawned a large number of depressions and storms within the subtropical belt near or north of latitude 25°N.

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NEIL L. FRANK

Abstract

A census of Atlantic tropical systems of 1969 presents information on the history of each tropical wave or disturbance, including the dates these systems passed three key stations: Dakar, Barbados, and San Andrés Island.

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NEIL L. FRANK

Abstract

The 1972 hurricane season produced 113 “seedlings” of which 24 acquired the closed circulation of a depression. This was the largest number of tropical systems observed since the National Hurricane Center began keeping records in 1968. The reason for this high number was the unusual development of many subtropical cyclones in temperate latitudes.

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NEIL L. FRANK

Abstract

“Easterly waves” in the tropical Atlantic have been found to be associated with a characteristic cloud pattern which has the appearance of an “Inverted V.” Cloud bands are aligned approximately parallel to the lower tropospheric winds and change orientation along the wave axis.

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NEIL L. FRANK

Abstract

The history of all tropical systems that formed over the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico during the 1970 hurricane season has been documented. There were a total of 87 systems from which 26 depressions and seven named storms evolved.

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Neil L. Frank

Abstract

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Neil L. Frank

Abstract

The 1975 hurricane season produced 113 “tropical systems”, of which 28 acquired the closed circulation of a depression. Over half of these (61) originated over the African Continent. This is the most African systems observed since our annual summary began in 1968. African seedlings initiated five of the eight named Atlantic storms and thirteen of the sixteen East Pacific storms.

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