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Paola Formenti
and
Manfred Wendisch
Full access
Paquita Zuidema
,
Jens Redemann
,
James Haywood
,
Robert Wood
,
Stuart Piketh
,
Martin Hipondoka
, and
Paola Formenti
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Manfred Wendisch
,
Paola Formenti
,
Tad Anderson
,
Alexander Kokhanovsky
,
Bernhard Mayer
,
Peter Pilewskie
,
Steve Platnick Jens Redemann
,
John Remedios
,
Peter Spichtinger
,
Didier Tanré
, and
Filip Vanhellemont
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Lucia Mona
,
Vassilis Amiridis
,
Emilio Cuevas
,
Antonis Gkikas
,
Serena Trippetta
,
Sophie Vandenbussche
,
Angela Benedetti
,
Pavla Dagsson-Waldhauserova
,
Paola Formenti
,
Alexander Haefele
,
Stelios Kazadzis
,
Peter Knippertz
,
Benoit Laurent
,
Fabio Madonna
,
Slobodan Nickovic
,
Nikolaos Papagiannopoulos
,
Gelsomina Pappalardo
,
Carlos Pérez García-Pando
,
Thomas Popp
,
Sergio Rodríguez
,
Andrea Sealy
,
Nobuo Sugimoto
,
Enric Terradellas
,
Ana Vukovic Vimic
,
Bernadette Weinzierl
, and
Sara Basart

Abstract

Mineral dust produced by wind erosion of arid and semiarid surfaces is a major component of atmospheric aerosol that affects climate, weather, ecosystems, and socioeconomic sectors such as human health, transportation, solar energy, and air quality. Understanding these effects and ultimately improving the resilience of affected countries requires a reliable, dense, and diverse set of dust observations, fundamental for the development and the provision of skillful dust-forecast-tailored products. The last decade has seen a notable improvement of dust observational capabilities in terms of considered parameters, geographical coverage, and delivery times, as well as of tailored products of interest to both the scientific community and the various end-users. Given this progress, here we review the current state of observational capabilities, including in situ, ground-based, and satellite remote sensing observations in northern Africa, the Middle East, and Europe for the provision of dust information considering the needs of various users. We also critically discuss observational gaps and related unresolved questions while providing suggestions for overcoming the current limitations. Our review aims to be a milestone for discussing dust observational gaps at a global level to address the needs of users, from research communities to nonscientific stakeholders.

Open access
Cyrille Flamant
,
Jean-Pierre Chaboureau
,
Julien Delanoë
,
Marco Gaetani
,
Cédric Jamet
,
Christophe Lavaysse
,
Olivier Bock
,
Maurus Borne
,
Quitterie Cazenave
,
Pierre Coutris
,
Juan Cuesta
,
Laurent Menut
,
Clémantyne Aubry
,
Angela Benedetti
,
Pierre Bosser
,
Sophie Bounissou
,
Christophe Caudoux
,
Hélène Collomb
,
Thomas Donal
,
Guy Febvre
,
Thorsten Fehr
,
Andreas H. Fink
,
Paola Formenti
,
Nicolau Gomes Araujo
,
Peter Knippertz
,
Eric Lecuyer
,
Mateus Neves Andrade
,
Cédric Gacial Ngoungué Langué
,
Tanguy Jonville
,
Alfons Schwarzenboeck
, and
Azusa Takeishi

Abstract

During the boreal summer, mesoscale convective systems generated over West Africa propagate westward and interact with African easterly waves, and dust plumes transported from the Sahel and Sahara by the African easterly jet. Once off West Africa, the vortices in the wake of these mesoscale convective systems evolve in a complex environment sometimes leading to the development of tropical storms and hurricanes, especially in September when sea surface temperatures are high. Numerical weather predictions of cyclogenesis downstream of West Africa remains a key challenge due to the incomplete understanding of the clouds–atmospheric dynamics–dust interactions that limit predictability. The primary objective of the Clouds–Atmospheric Dynamics–Dust Interactions in West Africa (CADDIWA) project is to improve our understanding of the relative contributions of the direct, semidirect, and indirect radiative effects of dust on the dynamics of tropical waves as well as the intensification of vortices in the wake of offshore mesoscale convective systems and their evolution into tropical storms over the North Atlantic. Airborne observations relevant to the assessment of such interactions (active remote sensing, in situ microphysics probes, among others) were made from 8 to 21 September 2021 in the tropical environment of Sal Island, Cape Verde. The environments of several tropical cyclones, including Tropical Storm Rose, were monitored and probed. The airborne measurements also serve the purpose of regional model evaluation and the validation of spaceborne wind, aerosol and cloud products pertaining to satellite missions of the European Space Agency and EUMETSAT (including the Aeolus, EarthCARE, and IASI missions).

Open access
Paola Formenti
,
Barbara D’Anna
,
Cyrille Flamant
,
Marc Mallet
,
Stuart John Piketh
,
Kerstin Schepanski
,
Fabien Waquet
,
Frédérique Auriol
,
Gerard Brogniez
,
Frédéric Burnet
,
Jean-Pierre Chaboureau
,
Aurélien Chauvigné
,
Patrick Chazette
,
Cyrielle Denjean
,
Karine Desboeufs
,
Jean-François Doussin
,
Nellie Elguindi
,
Stefanie Feuerstein
,
Marco Gaetani
,
Chiara Giorio
,
Danitza Klopper
,
Marc Daniel Mallet
,
Pierre Nabat
,
Anne Monod
,
Fabien Solmon
,
Andreas Namwoonde
,
Chibo Chikwililwa
,
Roland Mushi
,
Ellsworth Judd Welton
, and
Brent Holben

Abstract

The Aerosol, Radiation and Clouds in southern Africa (AEROCLO-sA) project investigates the role of aerosols on the regional climate of southern Africa. This is a unique environment where natural and anthropogenic aerosols and a semipermanent and widespread stratocumulus (Sc) cloud deck are found. The project aims to understand the dynamical, chemical, and radiative processes involved in aerosol–cloud–radiation interactions over land and ocean and under various meteorological conditions. The AEROCLO-sA field campaign was conducted in August and September of 2017 over Namibia. An aircraft equipped with active and passive remote sensors and aerosol in situ probes performed a total of 30 research flight hours. In parallel, a ground-based mobile station with state-of-the-art in situ aerosol probes and remote sensing instrumentation was implemented over coastal Namibia, and complemented by ground-based and balloonborne observations of the dynamical, thermodynamical, and physical properties of the lower troposphere. The focus laid on mineral dust emitted from salty pans and ephemeral riverbeds in northern Namibia, the advection of biomass-burning aerosol plumes from Angola subsequently transported over the Atlantic Ocean, and aerosols in the marine boundary layer at the ocean–atmosphere interface. This article presents an overview of the AEROCLO-sA field campaign with results from the airborne and surface measurements. These observations provide new knowledge of the interactions of aerosols and radiation in cloudy and clear skies in connection with the atmospheric dynamics over southern Africa. They will foster new advanced climate simulations and enhance the capability of spaceborne sensors, ultimately allowing a better prediction of future climate and weather in southern Africa.

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