Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 27 items for

  • Author or Editor: Patrick Heimbach x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Ian Fenty and Patrick Heimbach

Abstract

This study investigates the hydrographic processes involved in setting the maximum wintertime sea ice (SI) extent in the Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay. The analysis is based on an ocean and sea ice state estimate covering the summer-to-summer 1996/97 annual cycle. The estimate is a synthesis of in situ and satellite hydrographic and ice data with a regional coupled ⅓° ocean–sea ice model. SI advective processes are first demonstrated to be required to reproduce the observed ice extent. With advection, the marginal ice zone (MIZ) location stabilizes where ice melt balances ice mass convergence, a quasi-equilibrium condition achieved via the convergence of warm subtropical-origin subsurface waters into the mixed layer seaward of the MIZ.

An analysis of ocean surface buoyancy fluxes reveals a critical role of low-salinity upper ocean (100 m) anomalies for the advancement of SI seaward of the Arctic Water–Irminger Water Thermohaline Front. Anomalous low-salinity waters slow the rate of buoyancy loss–driven mixed layer deepening, shielding an advancing SI pack from the warm subsurface waters, and are conducive to a positive surface meltwater stabilization enhancement (MESEM) feedback driven by SI meltwater release. The low-salinity upper-ocean hydrographic conditions in which the MESEM efficiently operates are termed sea ice–preconditioned waters (SIPW).

The SI extent seaward of the Thermohaline Front is shown to closely correspond to the distribution of SIPW. The analysis of two additional state estimates (1992/93, 2003/04) suggests that interannual hydrographic variability provides a first-order explanation for SI maximum extent anomalies in the region.

Full access
Martin Losch and Patrick Heimbach

Abstract

Bottom topography, or more generally the geometry of the ocean basins, is an important ingredient in numerical ocean modeling. With the help of an adjoint model, it is shown that scalar diagnostics or objective functions in a coarse-resolution model, such as the transport through Drake Passage, the strength of the Atlantic Ocean meridional overturning circulation, the Deacon cell, and the meridional heat transport across 32°S, are sensitive to bottom topography as much as they are to surface boundary conditions. For example, adjoint topography sensitivities of the transport through Drake Passage are large in choke-point areas such as the Crozet–Kerguélen Plateau and south of New Zealand; the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation is sensitive to topography in the western boundary region of the North Atlantic Ocean and along the Scotland–Iceland Ridge. Many sensitivities are connected to steep topography and can be interpreted in terms of bottom form stress, that is, the product of bottom pressure and topography gradient. The adjoint sensitivities are found to agree with direct perturbation methods with deviations smaller than 30% for significant perturbations on time scales of 100 yr, so that the assumption of quasi linearity that is implicit in the adjoint method holds. The horizontal resolution of the numerical model affects the sensitivities to bottom topography, but large-scale patterns and the overall impact of changes in topography appear to be robust. The relative impact of changes in topography and surface boundary conditions on the model circulation is estimated by multiplying the adjoint sensitivities with assumed uncertainties. If the uncertainties are correlated in space, changing the surface boundary conditions has a larger impact on the scalar diagnostics than topography does, but the effects can locally be on the same order of magnitude if uncorrelated uncertainties are assumed. In either case, bottom topography variations within their prior uncertainties affect the solution of an ocean circulation model. To this extent, including topography in the control vector can be expected to compensate for identifiable model errors and, thus, to improve the solutions of estimation problems.

Full access
Carl Wunsch and Patrick Heimbach

Abstract

A dynamically consistent state estimate is used for the period 1992–2011 to describe the changes in oceanic temperatures and heat content, with an emphasis on determining the noise background in the abyssal (below 2000 m) depths. Interpretation requires close attention to the long memory of the deep ocean, implying that meteorological forcing of decades to thousands of years ago should still be producing trendlike changes in abyssal heat content. Much of the deep-ocean volume remained unobserved. At the present time, warming is seen in the deep western Atlantic and Southern Oceans, roughly consistent with those regions of the ocean expected to display the earliest responses to surface disturbances. Parts of the deeper ocean, below 3600 m, show cooling. Most of the variation in the abyssal Pacific Ocean is comparatively featureless, consistent with the slow, diffusive approach to a steady state expected there. In the global average, changes in heat content below 2000 m are roughly 10% of those inferred for the upper ocean over the 20-yr period. A useful global observing strategy for detecting future change has to be designed to account for the different time and spatial scales manifested in the observed changes. If the precision estimates of heat content change are independent of systematic errors, determining oceanic heat uptake values equivalent to 0.1 W m−2 is possibly attainable over future bidecadal periods.

Full access
Carl Wunsch and Patrick Heimbach

Abstract

The zonally integrated meridional and vertical velocities as well as the enthalpy transports and fluxes in a least squares adjusted general circulation model are used to estimate the top-to-bottom oceanic meridional overturning circulation (MOC) and its variability from 1992 to 2006. A variety of simple theories all produce time scales suggesting that the mid- and high-latitude oceans should respond to atmospheric driving only over several decades. In practice, little change is seen in the MOC and associated heat transport except very close to the sea surface, at depth near the equator, and in parts of the Southern Ocean. Variability in meridional transports in both volume and enthalpy is dominated by the annual cycle and secondarily by the semiannual cycle, particularly in the Southern Ocean. On time scales longer than a year, the solution exhibits small trends with complicated global spatial patterns. Apart from a net uptake of heat from the atmosphere (forced by the NCEP–NCAR reanalysis, which produces net ocean heating), the origins of the meridional transport trends are not distinguishable and are likely a combination of model disequilibrium, shifts in the observing system, other trends (real or artificial) in the meteorological fields, and/or true oceanic secularities. None of the results, however, supports an inference of oceanic circulation shifts taking the system out of the range in which changes are more than small perturbations. That the oceanic observations do not conflict with an apparent excess heat uptake from the atmosphere implies a continued undersampling of the global ocean, even in the upper layers.

Full access
Ian Fenty and Patrick Heimbach

Abstract

Sea ice variability in the Labrador Sea is of climatic interest because of its relationship to deep convection, mode-water formation, and the North Atlantic atmospheric circulation. Historically, quantifying the relationship between sea ice and ocean variability has been difficult because of in situ observation paucity and technical challenges associated with synthesizing observations with numerical models. Here the relationship between ice and ocean variability is explored by analyzing new estimates of the ocean–ice state in the northwest North Atlantic. The estimates are syntheses of in situ and satellite hydrographic and ice data with a regional ⅓° coupled ocean–sea ice model. The synthesis of sea ice data is achieved with an improved adjoint of a thermodynamic ice model. Model and data are made consistent, in a least squares sense, by iteratively adjusting control variables, including ocean initial and lateral boundary conditions and the atmospheric state, to minimize an uncertainty-weighted model–data misfit cost function. The utility of the state estimate is demonstrated in an analysis of energy and buoyancy budgets in the marginal ice zone (MIZ). In mid-March the system achieves a state of quasi-equilibrium during which net ice growth and melt approaches zero; newly formed ice diverges from coastal areas and converges via wind and ocean forcing in the MIZ. The convergence of ice mass in the MIZ is ablated primarily by turbulent ocean–ice enthalpy fluxes. The primary source of the enthalpy required for sustained MIZ ice ablation is the sensible heat reservoir of the subtropical-origin subsurface waters.

Full access
Carl Wunsch and Patrick Heimbach

Abstract

The zonally integrated meridional volume transport in the North Atlantic [Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC)] is described in a 19-yr-long ocean-state estimate, one consistent with a diverse global dataset. Apart from a weak increasing trend at high northern latitudes, the AMOC appears statistically stable over the last 19 yr with fluctuations indistinguishable from those of a stationary Gaussian stochastic process. This characterization makes it possible to study (using highly developed tools) extreme values, predictability, and the statistical significance of apparent trends. Gaussian behavior is consistent with the central limit theorem for a process arising from numerous independent disturbances. In this case, generators include internal instabilities, changes in wind and buoyancy forcing fields, boundary waves, the Gulf Stream and deep western boundary current transports, the interior fraction in Sverdrup balance, and all similar phenomena arriving as summation effects from long distances and times. As a zonal integral through the sum of the large variety of physical processes in the three-dimensional ocean circulation, understanding of the AMOC, if it is of central climate importance, requires breaking it down into its unintegrated components over the entire basin.

Full access
Carl Wunsch and Patrick Heimbach
Full access
Carl Wunsch and Patrick Heimbach

Abstract

Results from a global 1° model constrained by least squares to a multiplicity of datasets over the interval 1992–2004 are used to describe apparent changes in the North Atlantic Ocean meridional overturning circulation and associated heat fluxes at 26°N. The least squares fit is both stable and adequately close to the data to make the analysis worthwhile. Changes over the 12 yr are spatially and temporally complex. A weak statistically significant trend is found in net North Atlantic volume flux above about 1200 m, which drops slightly (−0.19 ± 0.05 Sv yr−1; 1 Sv ≡ 106 m3 s−1) but with a corresponding strengthening of the outflow of North Atlantic Deep Water and inflow of abyssal waters. The slight associated trend in meridional heat flux is very small and not statistically significant. The month-to-month variability implies that single-section determinations of heat and volume flux are subject to serious aliasing errors.

Full access
Timothy Smith and Patrick Heimbach

Abstract

Insights from the RAPID–MOCHA observation network in the North Atlantic have motivated a recent focus on the South Atlantic, where water masses are exchanged with neighboring ocean basins. In this study, variability in the South Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (SAMOC) at 34°S is attributed to global atmospheric forcing using an inverse modeling approach. The sensitivity of the SAMOC to atmospheric state variables is computed with the adjoint of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model, which is fit to 20 years of observational data in a dynamically consistent framework. The dynamical pathways highlighted by these sensitivity patterns show that the domain of influence for the SAMOC is broad, covering neighboring ocean basins even on short time scales. This result differs from what has previously been shown in the North Atlantic, where Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) variability is largely governed by dynamics confined to that basin. The computed sensitivities are convolved with surface atmospheric state variability from ERA-Interim to attribute the influence of each external forcing variable (e.g., wind stress, precipitation) on the SAMOC from 1992 to 2011. Here, local wind stress perturbations are shown to dominate variability on seasonal time scales while buoyancy forcing plays a minor role, confirming results from past forward perturbation experiments. Interannual variability, however, is shown to have originated from remote locations across the globe, including a nontrivial component originating from the tropical Pacific. The influence of atmospheric forcing emphasizes the importance of continuous widespread observations of the global atmospheric state for attributing observed AMOC variability.

Open access
Carl Wunsch, Rui M. Ponte, and Patrick Heimbach

Abstract

Estimates of regional patterns of global sea level change are obtained from a 1° horizontal resolution general circulation model constrained by least squares to about 100 million ocean observations and many more meteorological estimates during the period 1993–2004. The data include not only altimetric variability, but most of the modern hydrography, Argo float profiles, sea surface temperature, and other observations. Spatial-mean trends in altimetric data are explicitly suppressed to isolate global average long-term changes required by the in situ data alone. On large scales, some regions display strong signals although few individual points have statistically significant trends. In the regional patterns, thermal, salinity, and mass redistribution contributions are all important, showing that regional sea level change is tied directly to the general circulation. Contributions below about 900 m are significant, but not dominant, and are expected to grow with time as the abyssal ocean shifts. Estimates made here produce a global mean of about 1.6 mm yr−1, or about 60% of the pure altimetric estimate, of which about 70% is from the addition of freshwater. Interannual global variations may be dominated by the freshwater changes rather than by heating changes. The widely quoted altimetric global average values may well be correct, but the accuracies being inferred in the literature are not testable by existing in situ observations. Useful estimation of the global averages is extremely difficult given the realities of space–time sampling and model approximations. Systematic errors are likely to dominate most estimates of global average change: published values and error bars should be used very cautiously.

Full access