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Patrick J. Harney

Abstract

Concern for the performance of temperature sensitive elements on radiosondes led to these tests on ventilation rates in a special wind tunnel. Results with sondes in current use show large reductions in flow through the housings. Variations of flow with angle of attack indicate that 2:1 changes in convective heat dissipation of sensors in the air duct are possible.

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David L. Arenberg and Patrick J. Harney
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Horace R. Byers, Harry Moses, and Patrick J. Harney

Abstract

A technique for measuring the temperature of rain at the ground and the methods for calibrating the equipment used for this purpose are described in this report. A preliminary analysis of the data indicates that significant differences between the rain and ambient air temperatures usually occur in the first portion of the thunderstorm rain period and that the differences in temperature between the ambient air and the rain falling from the latter portion of the storm are small.

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Richard A. Craig, 1st Lt., A.C., Isadore Katz, and Patrick J. Harney, T/Sgt., A.C.
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Project Jet Stream

The Observation and Analysis of the Detailed Structure of the Atmosphere near the Tropopause

R. M. Endlich, Patrick Harney, G. S. McLean, Robert M. Rados, Maj. O. J. Tibbets, and W. K. Widger Jr.

The importance of “jet streams” and other near-tropopause phenomena to aircraft operations led to the establishment by the Air Force of a project for probing these regions. Two specially instrumented aircraft, a B-47 jet bomber and a B-29, are the data gathering vehicles. Their instrumentation is discussed and examples of the data gathered thus far are given. These data show that significant maxima and minima of wind speed can occur between reporting stations and indicate that at jet stream levels, the gradient wind is a much better approximation to observed space-averaged winds than the geostrophic.

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