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R. O. N. A. L. DD. McPHERSON

Abstract

A primitive-equation fine mesh limited-area barotropic model has been integrated using time steps of 0.5 hr. The increased time step possible and the reduction in computation time are due to the implicit treatment of the terms governing gravity waves in the difference equations. Comparative integrations of the semi-implicit model and an explicit model show only minor differences in a 24-hr forecast, but the former achieves a time advantage of 3.5:1.

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Christopher A. Fiebrich, David L. Grimsley, Renee A. McPherson, Kris A. Kesler, and Gavin R. Essenberg

Abstract

The Oklahoma Mesonet, jointly operated by the University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma State University, is a network of 116 environmental monitoring stations across Oklahoma. Technicians at the Oklahoma Mesonet perform three seasonal (i.e., spring, summer, and fall) maintenance passes annually. During each 3-month-long pass, a technician visits every Mesonet site. The Mesonet employs four technicians who each maintain the stations in a given quadrant of the state. The purpose of a maintenance pass is to 1) provide proactive vegetation maintenance, 2) perform sensor rotations, 3) clean and inspect sensors, 4) test the performance of sensors in the field, 5) standardize maintenance procedures at each site, 6) document the site characteristics with digital photographs, and 7) inspect the station’s hardware. The Oklahoma Mesonet has learned that routine and standardized station maintenance has two unique benefits: 1) it allows personnel the ability to manage a large network efficiently, and 2) it provides users access to a multitude of station metadata.

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M. S. Tracton, A. J. Desmaris, R. J. van Haaren, and R. D. McPherson

Abstract

As shown by the Data Systems Test results, the impact of satellite temperature soundings on numerical weather prediction is highly dependent on the particular analysis and forecast system used to incorporate the data. The more amenable a system is to improvements, the greater the potential for the satellite observations to produce a beneficial effect.

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M. S. Tracton, A. J. Desmarais, R. J. Van Haaren, and R. D. McPherson

Abstract

In order to assess the value of remote sounding data for numerical weather prediction, parallel sets of analyses were produced with (SAT) and without (NOSAT) the sounding data from the experimental Nimbus-6 and operational NOAA-4 satellites for the Data Systems Test periods, 18 August–4 September 1975 (DST-5), and 1 February–4 March 1976 (DST-6). All other factors, i.e., the assimilation method and remainder of the data base, were identical for both the SAT and NOSAT modes of each set. For selected days of DST-5 and DST-6, forecasts were generated through 72 h over the Northern Hemisphere. Differences between corresponding SAT and NOSAT analyses and the forecasts produced therefrom were assessed via a set of objective and subjective procedures, including evaluation of standard skill scores and judgment by experienced meteorologists.

The effect of remote temperature soundings in the NMC DST experiments was generally small and of inconsistent sign, i.e., beneficial in some cases, harmful in others. The average of these positive and negative contributions over the cases considered proved slightly positive for the DST-6 period and slightly negative for the DST-5 period. Neither result was judged of much meteorological consequence. Overall, we conclude that the remote soundings had little impact on forecasts in the Northern Hemisphere.

However, systematic differences were noted between the SAT and NOSAT analyses—the amplitude of weather systems was consistently less in the SAT mode. The reduced amplitude reflected an intrinsic characteristic of the remote soundings; viz., the tendency for the satellite temperature retrievals to underestimate the spatial variance in the thermal structure of the atmosphere.

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Christopher A. Fiebrich, Cynthia R. Morgan, Alexandria G. McCombs, Peter K. Hall Jr., and Renee A. McPherson

Abstract

Mesoscale meteorological data present their own challenges and advantages during the quality assurance (QA) process because of their variability in both space and time. To ensure data quality, it is important to perform quality control at many different stages (e.g., sensor calibrations, automated tests, and manual assessment). As part of an ongoing refinement of quality assurance procedures, meteorologists with the Oklahoma Mesonet continually review advancements and techniques employed by other networks. This article’s aim is to share those reviews and resources with scientists beginning or enhancing their own QA program. General QA considerations, general automated tests, and variable-specific tests and methods are discussed.

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L. M. Bastiaans, D. R. Smith, R. A. McPherson, P. A. Phoebus, J. M. Moran, P. J. Croft, M. J. Ceritelli, G. V. Rao, J. T. Schaefer, F. J. Gadomski, K. A. Kloesel, R. G. Quayle, and J. W. Zeitler

The American Meteorological Society held its Sixth Symposium on Education in conjunction with the 77th Annual Meeting in Long Beach, California. The theme of the symposium was “Atmospheric and Oceanographic Education: Teaching about the Global Environment.” Thirty-eight oral presentations and 37 poster presentations summarized a variety of educational programs or examined educational issues for both the precollege and university levels. There was also a joint session with the Eighth Symposium on Global Change Studies and a special session on “home pages” to promote popular meteorological education. Over 200 people representing a wide spectrum of the Society attended one or more of the sessions in this two-day conference where they increased their awareness of teaching about the global environment.

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P. A. Phoebus, D. R. Smith, R. A. McPherson, M. J. Hayes, J. M. Moran, P. J. Croft, J. T. Snow, E. S. Takle, R. L. Fauquet, L. M. Bastiaans, and J. W. Zeitler

The American Meteorological Society (AMS) held its Seventh Symposium on Education in conjunction with the 78th AMS Annual Meeting. The theme of the symposium was “Atmospheric and Oceanographic Education: Advancing Our Awareness.” Thirty-six oral presentations and 47 poster presentations summarized a variety of educational programs or examined educational issues relevant for both the precollege and university levels.

There were also joint sessions held with the Second Conference on Coastal Atmospheric and Oceanic Prediction and Processes and the Ninth Conference on Interaction of the Sea and Atmosphere, as well as the 10th Symposium on Meteorological Observations and Instruments. Over 200 people representing a wide spectrum of the Society attended one or more of the sessions during this two-day event.

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David R. Smith, Lisa M. Bastiaans, Jon W. Zeitler, Renee A. McPherson, Nezette N. Rydell, G.V. Rao, H. Patricia Warthan, Kevin A. KIoeseI, Brian E. Heckman, and Mohan K. Ramamurthy

The American Meteorological Society (AMS) held its Fifth Symposium on Education in conjunction with the 76th Annual Meeting in Atlanta, Georgia. The theme of this year's symposium was “Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences: Building the Future on a Solid Foundation.” Thirty-four oral presentations and 41 poster presentations summarized a variety of educational programs or examined issues of importance for both the precollege and university levels. There was also a joint session with the 12th International Conference on Interactive Information and Processing Systems for Meteorology, Oceanography, and Hydrography on new technologies for the classroom. Over 200 people representing a wide spectrum of the Society attended one or more of the sessions in this two-day conference, where they increased their awareness of educational initiatives of members and institutions associated with AMS.

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EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, George L. Frederick Jr., James F. Kimpel, Eugene M. Rasmusson, Ronald D. McPherson, Otis B. Brown, Bradley R. Colman, Judith A. Curry, Kenneth C. Spengler, and Richard E. Hallgren
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EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, Robert T. Ryan, Warren M. Washington, Donald R. Johnson, William D. Bonner, Margaret A. LeMone, Ronald D. McPherson, Richard E. Hallgren, and Kenneth C. Spengler
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