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R. K. Kapoor and Bh V. Ramana Murthi

Abstract

Using the Millipore filter technique, measurements have been made of the concentration of sulphate aerosols in ground air layers at Delhi during 1962-63. The aerosol content, on the average, is found to be high during winter (5.52 μgm m−3) and low during summer (2.76 μgm m−3) and the monsoon season (3.0 μgm m−3). In contrast to chloride aerosol, the sulphate concentration is about twice as large in winter but only about half as large in the other periods. It also undergoes a wider range of variation in its day-to-day content than does chloride during winter, but during the monsoon the trend is just the opposite. The pattern of variation of the sulphate aerosol content is not closely associated with that of the chloride. Details of particle distributions also appear to be unrelated to details of concurrent weather.

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K. R. Biswas, R. K. Kapoor, K. K. Kanuga, and Bh V. Ramana Murty

Abstract

An experiment on artificial stimulation of rain using a warm cloud seeding technique was undertaken in three nearby climatologically similar regions, Delhi, Agra and Jaipur in northwest India. Analysis of the data from 18 experiment-seasons has suggested a positive trend of the result, which is found significant by statistical tests.

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M. R. Kulkarni, B. B. Adiga, R. K. Kapoor, and V. V. Shirvaikar

Abstract

Measurements of concentration of salt in the air and its deposition on electrical insulators were made at Tarapur, a site on the west coast of India about 100 km north of Bombay. The aerosol coming from the sea during monsoon months was found to contain 74% NaCl. The salt concentration was found to increase exponentially with wind speed. The coefficients of the exponential fit are compared with measurements made elsewhere. Mass deposition velocity of the atmospheric salt on the inner corrugated surface of insulators which are not exposed to precipitation was also found to increase exponentially with wind speed.

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