Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: R. W. Sanders x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
D. M. Le Vine, M. Kao, R. W. Garvine, and T. Sanders

Abstract

A comparison is presented of remote and shipboard measurements of sea surface salinity made in the vicinity of the Delaware coastal current, a low salinity band with its source in the mouth of Delaware Bay. The remote sensing measurements were made from an aircraft with the Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer. The shipboard measurements were made with a thermosalinograph on board the R/V Cape Henlopen. On 29–30 April 1993, the R/V Cape Henlopen sailed from the mouth of Delaware Bay south toward Chesapeake Bay in an east–west zig-zag pattern, repeatedly crossing the coastal current. The aircraft, a NASA P-3, flew the same lines on the afternoon of 30 April. Both thermosalinograph- and microwave radiometer–derived salinity maps clearly show the freshwater signature of the coastal current and generally are in agreement to within about 1 psu.

Full access
C. A. Barth, R. W. Sanders, G. E. Thomas, G. J. Rottman, D. W. Rusch, R. J. Thomas, G. H. Mount, G. M. Lawrence, J. M. Zawodny, R. A. West, and J. London
Full access
Rainer Bleck, Howard Bluestein, Lance Bosart, W. Edward Bracken, Toby Carlson, Jeffrey Chapman, Michael Dickinson, John R. Gyakum, Gregory Hakim, Eric Hoffman, Haig lskenderian, Daniel Keyser, Gary Lackmann, Wendell Nuss, Paul Roebber, Frederick Sanders, David Schultz, Kevin Tyle, and Peter Zwack

The Eighth Cyclone Workshop was held at the Far Hills Inn and Conference Center in Val Morin, Quebec, Canada, 12–16 October 1992. The workshop was arranged around several scientific themes of current research interest. The most widely debated theme was the applicability of “potential vorticity thinking” to theoretical, observational, and numerical studies of the life cycle of cyclones and the interaction of these cyclones with their environment on all spatial and temporal scales. A combination of invited and contributed talks, with preference given to younger scientists, made up the workshop.

Full access
Scott F. Blair, Jennifer M. Laflin, Dennis E. Cavanaugh, Kristopher J. Sanders, Scott R. Currens, Justin I. Pullin, Dylan T. Cooper, Derek R. Deroche, Jared W. Leighton, Robert V. Fritchie, Mike J. Mezeul II, Barrett T. Goudeau, Stephen J. Kreller, John J. Bosco, Charley M. Kelly, and Holly M. Mallinson

Abstract

A field research campaign, the Hail Spatial and Temporal Observing Network Effort (HailSTONE), was designed to obtain physical high-resolution hail measurements at the ground associated with convective storms to help address several operational challenges that remain unsatisfied through public storm reports. Field phases occurred over a 5-yr period, yielding hail measurements from 73 severe thunderstorms [hail diameter ≥ 1.00 in. (2.54 cm)]. These data provide unprecedented insight into the hailfall character of each storm and afford a baseline to explore the representativeness of the climatological hail database and hail forecasts in NWS warning products. Based upon the full analysis of HailSTONE observations, hail sizes recorded in Storm Data as well as hail size forecasts in NWS warnings frequently underestimated the maximum diameter hailfall occurring at the surface. NWS hail forecasts were generally conservative in size and at least partially calibrated to incoming hail reports. Storm mode played a notable role in determining the potential range of maximum hail size during the life span of each storm. Supercells overwhelmingly produced the largest hail diameters, with smaller maximum hail sizes observed as convection became progressively less organized. Warning forecasters may employ a storm-mode hail size forecast philosophy, in conjunction with other radar-based hail detection techniques, to better anticipate and forecast hail sizes during convective warning episodes.

Full access
Matthew L. Druckenmiller, Twila A. Moon, Richard L. Thoman, Thomas J. Ballinger, Logan T. Berner, Germar H. Bernhard, Uma S. Bhatt, Jarle W. Bjerke, Jason E. Box, R. Brown, John Cappelen, Hanne H. Christiansen, B. Decharme, C. Derksen, Dmitry Divine, D. S. Drozdov, A. Elias Chereque, Howard E. Epstein, L. M. Farquharson, Sinead L. Farrell, Robert S. Fausto, Xavier Fettweis, Vitali E. Fioletov, Bruce C. Forbes, Gerald V. Frost, Emily Gargulinski, Sebastian Gerland, Scott J. Goetz, Z. Grabinski, Jens-Uwe Grooß, Christian Haas, Edward Hanna, Inger Hanssen-Bauer, Stefan Hendricks, Robert M. Holmes, Iolanda Ialongo, K. Isaksen, Piyush Jain, Bjørn Johnsen, L. Kaleschke, A. L. Kholodov, Seong-Joong Kim, Niels J. Korsgaard, Zachary Labe, Kaisa Lakkala, Mark J. Lara, Bryant Loomis, K. Luojus, Matthew J. Macander, G. V. Malkova, Kenneth D. Mankoff, Gloria L. Manney, James W. McClelland, Walter N. Meier, Thomas Mote, L. Mudryk, Rolf Müller, K. E. Nyland, James E. Overland, T. Park, Olga Pavlova, Don Perovich, Alek Petty, Gareth K. Phoenix, Martha K. Raynolds, C. H. Reijmer, Jacqueline Richter-Menge, Robert Ricker, Vladimir E. Romanovsky, Lindsay Scott, Hazel Shapiro, Alexander I. Shiklomanov, Nikolai I. Shiklomanov, C. J. P. P. Smeets, Sharon L. Smith, Amber Soja, Robert G. M. Spencer, Sandy Starkweather, Dimitri A. Streletskiy, Anya Suslova, Tove Svendby, Suzanne E. Tank, Marco Tedesco, X. Tian-Kunze, Mary-Louise Timmermans, Hans Tømmervik, Mikhail Tretiakov, Mark Tschudi, Sofia Vakhutinsky, Dirk van As, R. S. W. van de Wal, Sander Veraverbeke, Donald A. Walker, John E. Walsh, Muyin Wang, Melinda Webster, Øyvind Winton, K. Wood, Alison York, and Robert Ziel
Full access