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RAYMOND WEXLER

Abstract

An east-west line of thunderstorms passed southward into the Gulf of Mexico and the Florida peninsula. A large complex with an extensive anvil developed over the Gulf. The cold air outflow to the south of this storm was visible to TIROS as a thin line of cumulus clouds. When the line passed over the northern Florida peninsula, very active convection cells developed which subsequently penetrated to heights near 50,000 ft. No new cells developed over the Atlantic so that the line ended near the eastern coast of Florida. North of the line on the Florida east coast, the west-northwest gradient wind, the sea breeze effect, and the thunderstorm outflow caused renewed convection which developed a secondary line. South of the primary line the sea breeze prevailed, causing a line of cumulus clouds quite apparent on the TIROS photographs.

TIROS Channel 2 radiometer readings indicated that the storm over the Gulf had the highest cloud tops whereas radar measurements showed the towers over Florida were considerably higher than those over the Gulf. The apparent discrepancy is resolved by considering the field of view of the radiometer.

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Raymond Wexler

Abstract

The theoretical growth of hail and the behavior of the first radar echo in a cumulus cloud are analyzed. Good agreement is found between the theory and the observations of Workman and Reynolds.

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RADAR DETECTION OF A FRONTAL STORM 18 JUNE 1946

(Paper presented 28 December 1946 at the Annual Meeting, A. M. S., Cambridge, Massachusetts)

Raymond Wexler

Abstract

The theory of radar storm detection is briefly stated and applied to detection of the frontal storm of 18 June 1946. The precipitation pattern associated with the front is found to be a series of overlapping line squalls each about 100 miles in length. The mean rain intensity along the front is computed with the aid of radar theory.

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Raymond Wexler
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Raymond Wexler

Abstract

The mean difference in temperature ¯ΔT between a cirrus deck and an overshooting top in the shapes of an entire hemisphere and a spherical segment of a hemisphere is determined theoretically for different angles of view from a satellite sensor. The effects of changes in the area of the view and ¯ΔT on the equivalent blackbody temperature measured by a satellite are evaluated. Results show that changes in the mean temperature of the dome with the angle of view are as important as changes in the area of the field of view.

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Raymond Wexler

Abstract

The percentage of cold clouds ⩽240 K was tabulated from Nimbus-5 data in 2° latitude-longitude squares over tropical oceans in the North Atlantic and Pacific for day (1130 LST) and night (2330 LST).

The maximum percentage and amplitude of the diurnal variation are in the eastern Atlantic and Pacific. Day percentages are higher than at night in the entire 6–10°N belt of the Atlantic. Weaker night maxima are to the north and south of this belt. In the Pacific, the distribution of day and night predominance is more variable.

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Raymond Wexler

Abstract

A radar study of the streamers of 25 February 1954 at Cambridge, Mass., indicates that horizontal bands of rain are produced by the action of wind shear on the precipitation particles. It is suggested that a “generating layer,” responsible for the streamer formation, consists of a cumuliform cloud configuration within which ice crystals grow rapidly both by sublimation and by riming.

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Raymond Wexler

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Raymond Wexler

Abstract

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Raymond Wexler

Abstract

No abstract available.

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