Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 18 items for

  • Author or Editor: Reid A. Bryson x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search
Reid A. Bryson

On the basis of experience in Puerto Rico and the western Pacific, a scale for rating convective cloudforms in terms of the thermodynamic stability represented was developed. This scale provides a quantitative measure for the study of diurnal variation of cloudform, and for weather pattern diagnosis.

Full access
Reid A. Bryson

In the April 1951 issue of this Bulletin the author described the development of an objective scale for classifying the degrees of instability represented by the various forms of cumuliform cloud over the tropical oceans. In the present study this tool is applied to the description of several tropical weather phenomena.

Full access
Reid A. Bryson
Full access
Reid A. Bryson
Full access
Reid A. Bryson
Full access
Reid A. Bryson
Full access
Reid A. Bryson and David A. Baerreis

On the basis of field observations and theoretical studies it is believed that the dense pall of local dust over northwestern India and West Pakistan is a significant factor in the development of subsidence over the desert. Archeological evidence derived from the northern portion of the desert within India suggests a pattern of intermittent occupation with the role of man being important in making the desert. As man has made the desert, so through surface stabilization can he reduce the dust and consequently modify the subsidence and precipitation patterns in the region. The social consequences of such climatic modification are briefly considered.

Full access
Reid A. Bryson and Gerald J. Dittberner

Abstract

Not available.

Full access
Wayne M. Wendland and Reid A. Bryson

Abstract

Near-surface airstream source regions of the Northern Hemisphere have been identified using 16-year mean resultant winds from 3° latitude by 3° longitude grids. Tracing the airstreams back to their divergent centers reveals 19 different sources during various seasons of the year. Five of these sources(air originating over the North and South Pacific and Atlantic Oceans and air over Turkey) are resident in the Northern Hemisphere 12 months of the year. Another three (central Asian, Arctic and central East Asian air) exist for at least 11 months per year. The remaining 11 source regions are present from 1–9 months per year and their area of influence is much less than that of the 5 year-long sources.

In the mean, there are several favored locations for frontal zones, e.g., a north–south band in Mexico (dividing Atlantic from Pacific air), a north–south band in northern South America, and two northeast–southwest trending bands over the cast coasts of Asia and North America, representing the mean leading edges of continental airmasses.

Mean dew points demonstrate the character of the moisture discontinuity across several mean frontal boundaries. Gradients in moisture are apparent as one progresses from one airstream to another. These gradients are sharpest along confluences, coasts and mountain barriers, particularly when a confluence is near-coincident with a topographic boundary.

Full access
Thomas B. Starr and Reid A. Bryson

Abstract

No Abstract.

Full access