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Reid A. Bryson

On the basis of experience in Puerto Rico and the western Pacific, a scale for rating convective cloudforms in terms of the thermodynamic stability represented was developed. This scale provides a quantitative measure for the study of diurnal variation of cloudform, and for weather pattern diagnosis.

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Reid A. Bryson

In the April 1951 issue of this Bulletin the author described the development of an objective scale for classifying the degrees of instability represented by the various forms of cumuliform cloud over the tropical oceans. In the present study this tool is applied to the description of several tropical weather phenomena.

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Reid A. Bryson
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Reid A. Bryson
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Reid A. Bryson
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Reid A. Bryson
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Reid A. Bryson and David A. Baerreis

On the basis of field observations and theoretical studies it is believed that the dense pall of local dust over northwestern India and West Pakistan is a significant factor in the development of subsidence over the desert. Archeological evidence derived from the northern portion of the desert within India suggests a pattern of intermittent occupation with the role of man being important in making the desert. As man has made the desert, so through surface stabilization can he reduce the dust and consequently modify the subsidence and precipitation patterns in the region. The social consequences of such climatic modification are briefly considered.

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Thomas B. Starr and Reid A. Bryson

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WALTER I. CHRISTENSEN JR. and REID A. BRYSON

Abstract

Selected hourly surface observations from Madison, Wis. and Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn. are used as basic data for a series of analyses to determine the feasibility of establishing weather classifications. Component analysis (factor analysis) is applied to a sample of January data for Madison to reduce the number of variables needed to suitably describe each day meteorologically and to create orthogonality among these new variables. With these results as the design matrix in regression analysis, a mathematical model for each day is constructed and each day is compared to all other days in order to classify similar days into distinctive weather types. Every day within each class is compared with the synoptic situation for that day to establish whether these types form a reasonable synoptic pattern. The temporal and spatial validity of these newly found weather types is tested by applying the foregoing results to an independent January sample for Madison and an independent January sample for Minneapolis-St. Paul. The basic analytic techniques are then applied to a Madison July sample. Specifically, the results indicate that the elements of a meteorological observation may be expressed by a smaller number of independent components that agree with our knowledge of dynamics; and these newly created components may be applied in a multivariate analysis to establish distinctive weather types. These weather types are synoptically reasonable and their distribution about the usual pattern of Highs and Lows strongly resembles cloud models and photographs from satellites.

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Reid A. Bryson and William P. Lowry

Using the percent of climatological stations reporting rain as a measure of the raininess of a particular day in Arizona, a large increase in rainfall within a few days is found to occur about July 1 in most Arizona summers. By means of flow charts, upper air sequences, mean soundings, and diurnal temperature ranges, this increase is shown to be the result of a rather sharp transition from one dominant air mass to another over the state. The occurrence appears to be related to index, and a hemispherical singularity also appears to be related to the phenomenon.

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