Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 26 items for

  • Author or Editor: Richard A. Craig x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search
Richard A. Craig

Abstract

No abstract available.

Full access
Richard A. Craig

Abstract

No abstract available.

Full access
Richard A. Craig

Abstract

Full access
Richard A. Craig

Abstract

No abstract available.

Full access
Richard A. Craig

Abstract

No Abstract Available

Full access
Richard A. Craig
Full access
Richard A. Craig

Abstract

For a sample of 59 Umkehr measurements at Tallahassee, the N values are positively correlated with total amount of ozone at all zenith angles, and the normalized N values are positively correlated with the total amounts for the smaller zenith angles and negatively correlated for the larger zenith angles. If the Umkehr curves are expanded in terms of their empirical orthogonal functions, the expansion coefficients appear to have some predictive value for the coefficient of the first empirical orthogonal function describing the ozone distribution between 0 and 26 km. This coefficient in turn explains about 50% of the ozone variance.

Full access
Richard A. Craig

Abstract

The average surface-pressure variations after geomagnetically disturbed and geomagnetically quiet days are studied at various locations in a network covering the northern hemisphere between 30 and 70°N. For the same location and the same period of time, a marked negative correlation between the two average variations exists. A small amount of this correlation stems from serial correlations in the data. However, a careful statistical analysis indicates that a large part of the correlation results from unknown causes and presumably demonstrates a link between phenomena in the ionosphere and the troposphere.

Full access
Richard A. Craig

Abstract

Terms in the vorticity equation are approximated numerically for each of a act of grid points, map times and pressure levels in the lower stratosphere during January-February 1957. The hypothesis is advanced that the vorticity budget of the middle- and high-latitude, wintertime, lower stratosphere, even during periods of stratospheric warming, represents in the first approximation a balance between the advection term and the divergence term. It is a consequence of this hypothesis and some other approximations that a function Q of the height and temperature fields (Tz function) is a linear function of the height z for any given map. Statistical studies of this deduction show that the linear correlation coefficient between Q and z for any given map is around −0.9.

Full access
Richard A. Craig

Abstract

Detailed soundings of temperature and humidity between the surface and 1000 ft in warm air moving over cooler water are studied to determine the vertical transfer of heat and water vapor due to turbulence. Under simplifying assumptions, values of the eddy diffusivity are determined from the data at several heights and distances from shore and under varying wind and stability conditions. A simple model, in which the eddy diffusivity increases linearly with height in the lowest meter or two and is independent of height at higher levels, is shown to be consistent with the observations.

Full access