Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: Richard J. Kopec x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Richard J. Kopec

Abstract

An investigation of the effects of Chapel Hill, N.C., and its suburbs on the temporal and spatial patterns of dew point temperature was conducted in the early fall months of 1971. Six 55-mi traverses over city and non-city surfaces within restrictive limits of sky cover and wind velocity permitted the collecting of sufficient data for the construction and subsequent analyses of dew point maps. Approximately 650 recordings per traverse were made utilizing an EG & G Model 880 Dew Point Hygrometer. The study showed that humidity patterns at the meso-level conformed to urban-suburban control and their temporal variations indicated a reversal of high and low values from the city at night to the suburbs and rural areas during the day. In a like manner, the complexity of the spatial patterns intensifies from night to day with the afternoon observations showing the greatest range of values and the steepest gradients. The importance of the spatial aspect in studying atmospheric elements is made obvious in this study, and the need for similar investigations of the humidity variations displayed by cities of all sizes, in all seasons, and in climatically diverse regions is underscored.

Full access
Richard J. Kopec

Studies of the heat island effect produced by urban centers have focused almost exclusively on large cities. Knowledge concerning the extent to which small places, i.e., towns with less than 50,000 people, exert a similar effect on their atmospheric environment is limited in this country. Only at Palo Alto, Calif., and Corvallis, Oreg., have such studies been conducted. This paper reports the results of temperature measurements and their spatial patterns taken by mobile traverses during the course of three seasons at Chapel Hill, N. C., and compares the heat island effect identified in this small university town with previous studies. The comparison shows a similarity among derived data which lends support to the ranking of urban places by population size as a climatic parameter.

Full access
Richard J. Kopec

An attempt is made in this paper to identify the areal patterns of significant thermal influence exerted by the Great Lakes by use of the methods of anomalies and isanomal mapping. Empirical temperature models for the seasonal months of January, April, July and October were constructed and the mean monthly temperatures of some 500 stations within the Great Lakes Region were compared to these models. The same procedure was used for average annual temperature ranges. The resultant deviations were mapped and their patterns described and analyzed. Based on these patterns of mean deviations, the areal extent and seasonal variation of the Great Lakes' effect on vicinal temperature regimes is graphically shown, and the method of isanomal mapping is further substantiated as an effective climatological technique.

Full access
Richard J. Kopec
Full access